Writing Resources Center

The Writing Resources Center provides walk-in office hours at the library during select times. From September 11 through December 6, walk-in office hours will be in room G34 on the ground floor from 5:00-8:00 pm Monday through Thursday.    See more information about the Writing Resources Center .  

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Writing Resources Center

Visit the UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center website to schedule an appointment.

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University Writing Resources Center (WRC)

Based on the view that knowledge is fundamentally social, the WRC fosters an environment of active, collaborative learning outside the classroom. The WRC provides one-to-one writing instruction to students, faculty, and staff from first-year to graduate in any discipline. Our goal is not to fix papers, but to develop better writers.

The Center includes computing facilities that integrate word processing, research, tutoring, and assistive technologies. Online tutoring extends writing instruction beyond daytime hours to serve nontraditional and distance education students. In addition to its Web-based resources, the WRC houses a library of writing-related instructional materials. Consultation is available, on a limited basis, to support faculty in teaching writing across the curriculum. WRC staff also offer presentations and host workshops on such topics as avoiding plagiarism, documenting sources, peer response, and revision strategies. Some presentations are viewable on the WRC website .

Staffed by undergraduate and graduate students from a variety of disciplines, the WRC offers teaching experience and leadership opportunities to tutors, many of them future educators, as they develop their own writing abilities and interpersonal skills. Both novice and experienced writing assistants participate in ongoing professional development, including a semester-long training course, English 4400/5400: Theory & Practice of Tutoring Writing. Integral to that training, the WRC is a rich site for literacy research for students and faculty alike.

As a university-wide service invested in the teaching and learning of writing in every discipline, the WRC coordinates its efforts with other academic support services. The Center participates in university policy-making concerning writing and joins in the design and implementation of campus writing initiatives.

Services for Distance Education Students

Online tutoring is available now. Follow the set-up directions that are found here, Online tutoring.

Additionally, PowerPoint presentation slides are available online for some workshops presented on-campus. Writing Resource Center .

Writing Resources

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Writing Resources Center

The Writing Resources Center helps you with your writing skills.

The Writing Resources Center

  • The WRC is here to help you at any stage of the writing process for any subject (whether academic or personal).
  • Our tutors can help you understand an assignment sheet, brainstorm, or even begin drafting an outline.
  • If you’ve started writing but haven’t completed your first draft, we can give you feedback on direction and incorporating additional content.
  • If you’ve already finished writing, we can give you some tips for revising or proofreading.

Types of writing help

  • Face-to-face tutoring
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Click on the support resources below to be directed to the specific website:

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  • Location & Hours
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Graduate & Postdoctoral Writing Center

The graduate & postdoctoral writing center (gpwc).

This resource is the result of a collaboration between the Graduate School, the Division of Research and  The Writing Resources Center.

The GPWC offers writing support programs for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars to refine their writing and communication skills. Individual writing consultations, writing groups, workshops, retreats, and in-person and virtual appointments are available with support from the center's doctoral writing fellows and a faculty fellow. 

Big News!  Adam Reitzel , Professor of Biological Sciences and co-director for the  CIPHER Center , was recently named Faculty Fellow of Grant Writing in the new UNC Charlotte Graduate & Postdoctoral Writing Center.  Read more here  about what Dr. Reitzel has in store for the Spring semester!

Upcoming Writing Events

  • Weekend Write   |10:00 AM - 12:00 PM | Zoom | Every other Saturday
  • Formatting and Submitting Your Thesis or Dissertation | Michelle Hypki   facilitates these workshops twice each month.

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Proposal Writing Resources

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is North Carolina’s urban research university. It leverages its location in the state’s largest city to offer internationally competitive programs of research and creative activity; exemplary undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs; and a focused set of community engagement initiatives. A doctoral/research intensive institution, UNC Charlotte is the fourth largest of the 16 constituent members of the University of North Carolina and the largest institution of higher education in theCharlotte region. The 1,000-acre main campus holds 75 buildings, including residence halls, academic and student support buildings, and the J. Murrey Atkins Library, which contains two million volumes, state-of-the-art computer labs, and various special collections. The 11-story Center City Building opened in uptown Charlotte in 2011.

UNC Charlotte has seven colleges: the College of Arts and Architecture, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The Belk College of Business Administration, The Cato College of Education, The William States Lee College of Engineering, the College of Computing and Informatics, and the College of Health and Human Services. Offering 75 bachelor’s degree programs, 65 master’s degree programs, and 24 doctoral programs, the University’s faculty includes more than 1,000 members, with nearly 80% of the full-time teaching faculty holding the highest degrees attainable in their field.

Enrollment in Fall 2018 was 29,710 students (51% men, 49% women), including 5,323 graduate students. Enrollment is expected to increase annually through the year 2020, bringing the University a projected student body of more than 32,000. Minority students make up approximately 36% of the student body.

Recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a Community Engaged University, UNC Charlotte is fully committed to the discovery, dissemination, synthesis, and application of knowledge and aspires to national and international excellence in these activities. Grant and contract research totals nearly $51 million a year. The Office of Industry and Government Partnerships, the University’s industry-collaborative arm, builds on disciplines in which the University already excels: precision metrology and intelligent manufacturing, visualization, optoelectronics, bioinformatics, biomedical engineering systems, energy production and infrastructure, information security, motorsports and automotive engineering, nanoscale science and translational research.

University Research Computing offers consulting services for faculty developing research grant proposals that include needs for access to high performance computing and/or networking resources.

UNC Charlotte faculty and staff can access grant-writing resources and workshop materials through the Center for Research Excellence’s Canvas page: Proposal Development Resources and Materials . Just enroll using your NinerNET username and password.

Resources include an ebook – New Faculty Guide to Competing for Research Funding – that offers information on what new faculty need to know about finding funding and writing research proposals. This ebook was published by Lucy Deckard and Mike Cronan of Academic Research Funding Strategies LLC., who provide consulting services to colleges and universities on a wide range of topics related to research development.

Online Resources & Tips

(most of these tips are not agency-specific but general enough to apply to any proposal)

Department of Education (ED):

  • Organizing Your Grant Application
  • Funding Your Best Ideas: A 12-Step Program
  • How to Get a FIPSE Grant

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

  • Tips on Writing a Grant Proposal

National Institutes of Health (NIH):

NIH Office of Extramural Research

  • Grant Writing Tips Sheets

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Apply for a Grant

National Science Foundation (NSF):

  • Grant Proposal Guide (January 2016)
  • Broader Impacts Proposal Requirements
  • Guidelines for Writing Grant Proposals (Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences)

The Foundation Center ’s “Virtual Classroom” offers several online tutorials including the following:

  • Guide to Funding Research
  • Proposal Budgeting Basics
  • The Art of Writing Proposals from the Social Science Research Council
  • Guide for Writing a Funding Proposal by Dr. S. Joseph Levine from Michigan State University
  • The Research Assistant offers assistance to those seeking funding for behavioral science research

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FEIG ELECTRONIC: Moscow-City Skyscrapers Streamline Parking Access and Control with Secure RFID

Feig electronic partners with isbc group to deploy ucode dna rfid security and parking access control solution in moscow business district.

Weilburg, Germany  — December 3,  2019  —  FEIG ELECTRONIC , a leading global supplier of radio frequency identification (RFID) readers and antennas with fifty years of industry experience, announces deployment of the UCODE DNA RFID security and parking contactless identification solution in the Moscow International Business Center, known as Moscow-City, one of the world’s largest business district projects.

The management of Moscow-City not only selected long-range, passive UHF RFID to implement in its controlled parking areas, it also chose to implement UCODE DNA , the highest form of secure RAIN RFID technology, developed by NXP Semiconductors.

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Panoramic view of Moscow city and Moskva River at sunset. New modern futuristic skyscrapers of Moscow-City – International Business Center, toned

“Underscoring NXP’s innovation and leadership in developing advanced RAIN RFID technologies, our UCODE DNA was chosen to be incorporated with the FEIG and ISBC implementation of the contactless identification system in the prestigious Moscow-City,” said Mahdi Mekic, marketing director for RAIN RFID with NXP Semiconductors. “This exciting project represents yet another successful deployment of NXP’s contactless portfolio, and showcases our continued ability to meet the high-security requirements of highly demanding applications without compromising user convenience.”

“UCODE DNA is considered the only identification technology to match the physical protection of a barrier with the cybersecurity necessary to truly protect entrances from unauthorized access,” said Manuel Haertlé, senior product manager for FEIG Electronic. “As a respected contactless payment technology company, FEIG applies security know-how from its payment terminals, which are fully certified according to the latest high-class security standards, into our RFID systems. FEIG vehicle access control RFID readers incorporate advanced secure key storage elements, supporting various methods for secure key injection.”

FEIG’s partner ISBC Group provided the knowledge and support for this successful implementation using  FEIG’s long-range UHF RFID . The resulting system enables authorized vehicle entry into areas reserved for private residential use or corporate tenants, while also allowing availability of temporary, fee-based visitor parking. Thanks to the cryptographic authentication of UCODE DNA, both the tag and reader must go through an authentication procedure before the reader will validate the data from the tag, which is transmitted wirelessly. This level of authentication is typically used in the most secure data communication networks.

“The system’s two-step authentication means that only authorized equipment can handle the secure protocol and the data exchange with the UCODE DNA based tag. Without the required cryptographic secrets, other readers would query the tag in vain, because the tag’s response cannot be interpreted or understood,” said Andrey Krasovskiy, director of the RFID department at ISBC Group. “On top of this, each data exchange in the authentication process is unique, so even if a malicious actor were to intercept the communication, the transmission is only good for a single exchange and the tag’s unique identity is protected from cloning.”

Established in 1992 and still growing, Moscow-City is the revitalization and transformation of an industrial riverfront into a new, modern, vibrant and upscale business and residential district. A mix of residential, hotel, office, retail and entertainment facilities, it is located about four kilometers west of Red Square along the Moscow River. Twelve of the twenty-three planned facilities have already been completed, with seven currently under construction. Six skyscrapers in Moscow-City reach a height of at least 300 meters, including Europe’s tallest building, Federation Tower, which rises more than 100 stories.

Partnering with ISBC and deploying FEIG Electronic RFID solutions, the Moscow International Business Center is delivering security and access control to its city center today, as it grows into the city of tomorrow.

About FEIG ELECTRONIC

FEIG ELECTRONIC GmbH, a leading global supplier of RFID readers and antennas is one of the few suppliers worldwide offering RFID readers and antennas for all standard operating frequencies: LF (125 kHz), HF (13.56 MHz), UHF (860-960 MHz). A trusted pioneer in RFID with more than 50 years of industry experience, FEIG ELECTRONIC delivers unrivaled data collection, authentication, and identification solutions, as well as secure contactless payment systems. Readers from FEIG ELECTRONIC, which are available for plug-in, desktop, and handheld applications, support next-generation contactless credit cards, debit cards, smart cards, NFC and access control credentials to enable fast, accurate, reliable and secure transactions. For more information, visit:  www.feig.de/en

Founded in Moscow in 2002, ISBC Group provides knowledge and support to integrators for their successful implementation of RFID and smart card-based solutions. The company specializes in the distribution of smart card equipment, contact and contactless card manufacturing, smart card and RFID personalization services, and information security.  Its Research and Design Center is focused specifically on RFID, primarily HF and UHF solutions with NXP tags, and software development for the smart card industry. For more information visit:  https://isbc-cards.com/

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Moscow downtown historic district.

  • Location: Moscow Idaho Regional Essays: Idaho Latah County Architect: Robert H. Barton Leonidas McCartor Michael Shields William J. McConnell James McGuire Milburn Kenworthy Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

What's Nearby

Wendy R. McClure, " Moscow Downtown Historic District ", [ Moscow , Idaho ], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ID-01-057-0003 . Last accessed: February 25, 2024.

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According to historians who traveled throughout North Idaho at the turn of the twentieth century to interpret the early histories and future viability of the region’s towns, Moscow was a community where the early “pioneers got it right.” In 1903, visiting historians observed a thriving town in the center of a rich agricultural valley, where commercial development significantly outpaced resident population growth. They noted that, here, in contrast to other pioneer settlements, railroad companies accepted early settlers’ geographic choice for the town center rather than forcing the town to move the commercial districts to accommodate railroad interests. Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city.

Multiple conditions favored early Moscow’s capacity to achieve stability and prosperity as a business center during its formative years. The region’s geography was naturally accommodating of human habitation. For hundreds of years “Tatkinmah,” the “valley of the spotted deer” in which Moscow is located, served as a seasonal meeting grounds for tribal peoples including the Nez Perce, Coeur d’Alene, and Palouse, who frequented the area to harvest camas roots, trade, and race horses. Early settlers benefitted from ease of access to the region afforded by the Nez Perce Trail, which climbed two thousand feet from the tribe’s winter home in the Snake River Valley. In 1871, the first wave of homesteaders ascended the trail and claimed land in what they called “Paradise Valley,” a landscape of rich soil, bucolic grassy hills, and gently flowing streams. As farm families in pursuit of a permanent home, they brought early stability to the area and a need for a commercial marketplace. Moscow’s formative years also benefitted from the foresight and generosity of four homesteaders and businessmen (Almon Lieuallen, James Deakin, Henry McGregor, and John Russell), who each donated 30 acres of their intersecting claims to establish the initial townsite and commercial center. From the start, they established a climate for community stability by cultivating commercial enterprises along Main Street. Their motivations differed from those of fortunes seekers throughout the west, who temporarily populated, and exploited, early western settlements and then moved on.

Given its central location within a highly productive agricultural landscape, downtown Moscow quickly expanded from its humble beginnings into a booming regional marketplace for outlying communities and farmsteads. In 1885, the railroad arrived downtown, assuring Moscow’s role as a regional shipping point. Equally vital to the commercial district’s economic well-being, was the territorial legislature’s 1888 decision to locate the University of Idaho in Moscow. The combined economic stimuli afforded by agriculture, railroad linkage, and education produced downtown Moscow’s most significant period of commercial development. All downtown buildings constructed between 1888 and 1893 were either retail establishments or banks; over one-third of buildings designated as “contributing” to Moscow’s National Historic Downtown District were built in this period. Their developers, which included William McConnell, Robert H. Barton, and Michael Shields, were among Moscow’s most influential local businessmen. In architectural stature and purpose, these buildings remain unsurpassed by later periods of downtown development.

In 1891, William McConnell and his partner, James McGuire, erected the McConnell-McGuire Building, a three-story department store on the southeast corner of First and Main Streets. The physical heart of downtown during this period, however, developed at the intersection of Fourth and Main Streets, where a prominent commercial building was constructed at each corner between 1889 and 1891. All of the structures were built of brick, as required by an 1891 city ordinance regulating fire safety. The 1891 Skattaboe Block, originally constructed on the southwest corner of the intersection in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, was modified at the street level in the 1980s. The Hotel Moscow, a replacement building following a catastrophic fire in 1890, was also designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Across the street on the northeast corner, Leonidas McCartor erected two mixed-use buildings in the Romanesque Revival style in 1891 and 1896, respectively. The 1891 building initially served as Farmer’s Bank before becoming Moscow’s City Hall in 1900, and it served in that capacity until the mid-twentieth century. Use of the Italianate style for downtown buildings was also relatively common as in the Shields Building on the intersection’s southeast corner. Michael Shields developed the Shields Building North as Moscow’s first three-story brick building with an elevator in 1889. The building has since lost some of its original ornamentation and has been modified at the street level.

Mirroring national economic trends, downtown development and construction activity paused during the economic panic of 1893. The national recession led to a slowdown in new construction and the upper floors of several department stores were converted from retail space to offices and apartments between 1893 and 1900. Main Street’s growth resumed in tandem with the country’s economic recovery. Twenty percent of the downtown district’s current inventory of buildings was built between 1900 and World War I. The majority are one- and two-part, block-style commercial buildings. They are smaller in scale and simpler in their detailing than buildings associated with downtown’s peak period. The Kenworthy Theater, a vaudeville and motion picture venue, is a notable exception. Between World War I and World War II, downtown continued to infill with brick and concrete block buildings designed in period-appropriate Art Deco and Spanish Mission styles. Both downtown movie theaters exhibit Art Deco influences and remain popular destinations for cultural entertainment and community events.

Typical of downtowns throughout the country during the post–World War II period, retail businesses and buildings along Moscow’s Main Street suffered from the erosive effects of highway traffic and shopping mall construction. A downtown revitalization initiative in 1980, featuring highway rerouting, streetscape improvements, and construction of a public plaza at the downtown’s core intersection at 4th and Main, helped to re-establish Main Street as a center for public life. The historic integrity of even the most prominent downtown buildings has been compromised, and many bear the marks of storefront modifications intended to forestall retail decline. Collectively, however, they provide a palimpsest of inherited culture and visitors to Moscow’s Main Street need only look up from street level at the brick buildings to connect with late-nineteenth-century community builders who had envisioned downtown Moscow as a bustling regional marketplace.

Attebury, J. Building Idaho: An Architectural History. Moscow: University of Idaho Press, 1991.

David, H. “Moscow at the Turn of the Century.” Moscow, ID: Local History Paper #6, Latah County Historical Society, 1979.

Hibbard, Don, “McConnell-McGuire Building,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1977. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, “Moscow Downtown Historic District,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2005. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, and D. Krae, “Kenworthy Theater,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2001. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Monroe, J. Moscow: Living and Learning on the Palouse , Charleston, SC: Making of America Series, Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Otness, L. A Great Good Country: A Guide to Historic Moscow and Latah County, Idaho . Moscow, ID: Local History Paper # 8, Latah County Historical Society, 1983.

Western Historical Publishing Company. An Illustrated History of North Idaho: embracing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai and Shoshone Counties, State of Idaho . Spokane, WA: Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903.

Wright, Patricia, “Hotel Moscow,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1978. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Writing Credits

  • Location: Moscow, Idaho Regional Overviews: Latah County Architect: Milburn Kenworthy Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

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  1. UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center: A Place For Help

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  1. Writing Resources Center

    Writing Resources Center The Writing Resources Center is committed to supporting Charlotte's linguistically diverse population of students, faculty, and staff. Schedule an appointment Join Zoom Room (Password: WRC) Learn About the WRC What we do

  2. Writing Resources Center

    facebook instagram flickr linkedin twitter youtube maps. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 9201 University City Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 704-687 ...

  3. UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center

    UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center Spring 2024 Early Semester Schedules (Jan. 10 - Feb. 2) WRC Spring 2024 Early Hours Cameron 125 Face-to-Face, Zoom Video Conferencing, e-Tutoring (asynchronous) Monday-Thursday 10am - 3pm Grad/Postdoc Denny 213 & Online Spring 2024 Face-to-Face, Zoom Video Conferencing, e-Tutoring (asynchronous)

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    Access WRC Schedule How to make an Appointment All of our appointments are scheduled through our online scheduling software. You can follow these directions to make an appointment: Go to uncc.mywconline.com. Register for an account using your UNC Charlotte email address. Log in, using the email address and password you just registered with.

  5. Writing Resources Center

    Home Visit & Study Hours Writing Resources Center Writing Resources Center The Writing Resources Center provides walk-in office hours at the library during select times. From September 11 through December 6, walk-in office hours will be in room G34 on the ground floor from 5:00-8:00 pm Monday through Thursday.

  6. Writing Resources Center

    Writing Resources Center Shakespeare in Action Writing Resources Center Visit the UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center website to schedule an appointment.

  7. University Writing Resources Center (WRC)

    The WRC provides one-to-one writing instruction to students, faculty, and staff from first-year to graduate in any discipline. Our goal is not to fix papers, but to develop better writers. The Center includes computing facilities that integrate word processing, research, tutoring, and assistive technologies.

  8. The Writing Resources Corner

    All tutors been trained in writing center pedagogy and rhetorical grammar in the semester-long training course, English 4400/5400, regardless of their level of experience. In the course, tutors read and write about writing center scholarship, discuss tutoring practices, and conduct writing center research while training hands-on in the WRC.

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    Editing and Proofreading When you book an appointment at the WRC, your tutor can give you strategies for editing and proofreading, in addition to providing tips for revision, helping you brainstorm, or giving you feedback on your writing so far.

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    The Writing Resources Corner Writing Resources UNC Charlotte Appointment Scheduler ( uncc.mywconline.com) UNC Charlotte members can login and make an appointment to meet with tutors BYU Style Academy ( styleacademy.byu.edu) Focuses on sentence combining and imitation Helpful for sentence-level writing The Writer's Diet by Helen Sword

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    Our Mission Write with confidence at the WRC. Our Team Learn more about our directors and writing consultants. The Write Place Check out our tutor-created newsletter. Become a Tutor Interested in joining our team? Learn more! Research Learn about our team's innovative writing center research. Contact US Questions? Ideas? Reach out to us!

  12. Writing Resources Center

    The Writing Resources Center. The WRC is here to help you at any stage of the writing process for any subject (whether academic or personal). Our tutors can help you understand an assignment sheet, brainstorm, or even begin drafting an outline. If you've started writing but haven't completed your first draft, we can give you feedback on ...

  13. Resources

    Campus Support Resources. Click on the support resources below to be directed to the specific website: Adult Students and Evening Services. Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Code of Student Responsibility. Dean of Students Office. Disability Services. Free Legal Services for Students (Off-Campus Resource)

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    Writing Resources Center. UNC Charlotte | Cameron 125. 9201 University City Blvd. Charlotte, N.C. 28223-0001 Phone: 704‑687‑1899 Fax: 704‑687‑1408. For questions about appointments, please contact [email protected] or visit our Schedule and Appointment page.

  15. Graduate & Postdoctoral Writing Center

    This resource is the result of a collaboration between the Graduate School, the Division of Research and The Writing Resources Center. The GPWC offers writing support programs for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars to refine their writing and communication skills.

  16. UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center

    Register for a New Account. Fill out the form below in order to create a new account on this system. Fields marked with * are required. First Name *. Last Name *. Name Pronunciation. Email Address *. Student ID *. Telephone Number.

  17. Proposal Writing Resources

    A doctoral/research intensive institution, UNC Charlotte is the fourth largest of the 16 constituent members of the University of North Carolina and the largest institution of higher education in theCharlotte region. ... UNC Charlotte faculty and staff can access grant-writing resources and workshop materials through the Center for Research ...

  18. FEIG ELECTRONIC: Moscow-City Skyscrapers Streamline Parking Access and

    Partnering with ISBC and deploying FEIG Electronic RFID solutions, the Moscow International Business Center is delivering security and access control to its city center today, as it grows into the city of tomorrow. About FEIG ELECTRONIC. FEIG ELECTRONIC GmbH, a leading global supplier of RFID readers and antennas is one of the few suppliers ...

  19. Undergraduate Admissions

    18% of Carolina's new students will be first in their families to graduate from college. 42% of enrolling students were among the top 10 students in their high school class. 74% of new students took part in service activities while in high school. Meet Carolina's Newest Students. Every UNC student that I met was so welcoming and nice.

  20. Our Team

    Ph.D., Associate Professor, English teacher, teacher trainer, textbook writer, Management Board member of the National Writing Centers Consortium (NWCC). She directs the HSE Academic Writing. She has widely published in the field of ELT methodology. She authored a number of EFL course books for university students and academics.

  21. Style Guides

    We've compiled a list of online style guides for each of the four most common documentation styles: APA, CMS/Turabian, IEEE, and MLA. That way, you can easily access everything you need to cite your sources—all in one place. Click on one of the following links or scroll down to see each style guide: APA—American Psychological Association

  22. Moscow Downtown Historic District

    Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city. Multiple conditions favored early Moscow's capacity to achieve stability ...

  23. Writing Appointments

    The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 9201 University City Blvd Charlotte, NC 28223-0001