Art of Presentations

What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

By: Author Shrot Katewa

What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

When creating a PowerPoint presentation, it is essential to determine the appropriate size for your slides. Understanding the size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels is crucial to ensure that your presentation looks great on all devices, from desktops to mobile devices.

The standard size of a PowerPoint slide is 1024×768 pixels and the widescreen PowerPoint slide is “1920×1080” pixels. It can also be adjusted based on your preferences or the requirements of the platform on which you plan to present your slides.

In this article, we will discuss the standard size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels or inches as well as how to adjust it to fit your needs. Let’s get started!

1. What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, there are multiple preset slide sizes available. You can also customize the size of the slide using the “Custom Slide Size” feature available in the application. Depending on the slide size you select, the size of the slide in pixels will vary.

1.1 What is the Size of a PowerPoint Standard Slide in Pixels?

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The “Standard (4:3)” option in Microsoft PowerPoint used to be the only size option in the beginning since most screens from 2010 and before were that size. The standard slide size in PowerPoint is “1024×768” pixels. 

1.2 What is the Size of a PowerPoint Widescreen Slide in Pixels?

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In Microsoft PowerPoint, the default size of the slides is the “Widescreen (16:9)” option. The widescreen PowerPoint slide is “1920×1080” pixels.

2. What is the Size of a PowerPoint On-Screen Show Slide in Inches?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, the size of the slides is mostly measured in inches. Using the “Slide Size” dialog box, you can check the dimension of a slide in inches. Depending on the type of the selected slide, the slide size varies. There are three different “On-Screen Show” slide sizes available in Microsoft PowerPoint.

2a On-Screen Show (4:3)

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The “On-Screen Show (4:3)” slides are “10×7.5” inches in size. This is the “Standard” slide size.

2b On-Screen Show (16:9)

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The “On-Screen Show (16:9)” slide size is “10 x 5.625” inches in dimension. This is the “Widescreen” option which is the default slide size in PowerPoint.

2c On-Screen Show (16:10)

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The “On-Screen Show (16:10)” slides are “10 x 6.25” inches in width and height respectively.

3. How to Find the Size of the Slide in Inches?

Using the “Slide Size” dialog box in Microsoft PowerPoint, you can find the size of the slides in your presentation in inches. To do so, follow the 3 quick steps.

Step-1: Click on the “Design” tab

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen, click on the “Design” tab. This will open the “Design” menu.

Step-2: Click on the “Slide Size” option

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu, click on the “Slide Size” option. Then click on the “Custom Slide Size” option in the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option. This will open a dialog box.

Step-3: Click on the “OK” button

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, you can now see the size of the slide in inches in the “Width” and “Height” boxes. Then click on the “OK” button at the bottom of the dialog box to close it.

4. How to Change the Size of a PowerPoint Slide?

In Microsoft PowerPoint, you can change the side of the slides using the “Design” menu. However, you can only change the size of all the slides in a presentation at once. To change the size of the slide in PowerPoint, follow the 3 simple steps.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The first step is to open the “Design” menu. To do so, click on the “Design” tab in the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu, you have to now click on the “Slide Size” option. This will open a dropdown menu containing the preset slide size options available in PowerPoint.

Step-3: Click on your preferred slide size

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Finally, all you have to do is click on your preferred slide size option from the preset options available in the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option. The available slide sizes are “Standard” and “Widescreen” .

4.1 How to Customize the Size of a PowerPoint Slide?

The “Custom Slide Size” feature in Microsoft PowerPoint allows you to customize the size of all the slides in a presentation. Using the feature, you can set any dimension to the slides in your presentation. To customize the size of the slides in a presentation, follow the 7 easy steps.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The first step is to open the PowerPoint presentation file where you want to customize the size of the presentation slides. Then click on the “Design” tab in the menu ribbon located at the top of the screen to open the “Design” menu.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The next step is to click on the “Slide Size” option in the “Customize” group of the “Design” menu. In the dropdown menu, the default slide size is the “Widescreen (16:9)” option.

Step-3: Click on the “Custom Slide Size” option

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Now all you have to do is click on the “Custom Slide Size” option at the bottom of the dropdown menu under the “Slide Size” option in the “Design” menu. This will open a dialog box.

Step-4: Click on the “Slide sized for” option

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, click on the “Slides sized for” option. Then click on the “Custom” option at the bottom of the dropdown menu under the “Slides sized for” box.

Step-5: Click on the “Width” box

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

In the “Slide Size” dialog box, the next step is to click on the “Width” box. Now you can type in your preferred width of the slides in inches. You can also use the up and down arrows in the “Width” box to increase or decrease the width of the slide respectively.

Step-6: Click on the “Height” box

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The next step is to customize the height of the slides. To do so, click on the “Height” box in the “Slide Size” dialog box and type in your preferred slide height in inches. You can also click on the up or down arrows in the “Height” box to adjust the height of the slides to your preference.

Step-7: Click on the “OK” button

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Finally, all you have to do is click on the “OK” button at the bottom of the “Slide Size” dialog box to save the custom size for the slides in the presentation file.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Change the size of your slides

Basic steps.

To change the slide size:

Select the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon.

Slide Size icon

Select Standard (4:3 aspect ratio) or Widescreen (16:9) or Custom Slide Size .

Comparison of standard and widescreen slide-size ratios

For more about the predefined sizes (including formats like Overhead, A3, A4, Banner, B4, and B5) or your own custom sizing, click a heading below to expand it and see the details .

Detailed steps

Choose the standard or widescreen slide size.

On the Design tab of the Ribbon, locate Slide Size in the Customize group, near the far right end of the toolbar.

The Slide Size button is at the far right end of the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon

Select Slide Size , and then select either Standard (4:3) or Widescreen (16:9) .

Slide Size button in the Customize group

When PowerPoint is unable to automatically scale your content, it prompts you with two options:

Maximize : Select this option to increase the size of your slide content when you are scaling to a larger slide size. Choosing this option could result in your content not fitting on the slide.

Ensure Fit : Select this option to decrease the size of your content when scaling to a smaller slide size. This could make your content appear smaller, but you’ll be able to see all content on your slide.

Ensure or maximize fit

The 16:9 widescreen setting is the default value for new presentations you create. When you change the slide size for a presentation, the size you choose only applies to that presentation.  However, you can make it easy to create a new 4:3 presentation for yourself whenever you want—by defining a custom theme that uses the 4:3 aspect ratio. See the section below named "Make a default size to start from when creating new presentations."

Choose another size, such as A3, B4, or Overhead

Select Slide Size , and then select Custom Slide Size .

Custom Slide Size menu option

In the Slide Size box, click the down arrow next to Slides sized for and select an option. Their dimensions are listed below:

Overhead provides an aspect ratio very close to the standard 4:3 slide size.

There are two options for 16:9 aspect ratios:

On-screen Show (16:9) sets the slide dimensions to 10 in x 5.625 in.

Widescreen sets it to 13.333 in x 7.5 in.

Both of these options are the same aspect ratio so they will look the same in Normal View , since PowerPoint automatically adjusts the zoom level. Widescreen (13.333 in x 7.5 in.) provides more slide surface area for the content, so that is the best choice for presentations. Widescreen won’t fit on an 8.5" x 11" sheet of paper without you having to scale it down.

Widescreen or On-screen Show 16:9

Select OK to accept the dimensions and close the Slide Size dialog box.

Choose custom dimensions (in inches, centimeters, or pixels)

The Slide Size dialog box opens.

In the Slide Size dialog box, ensure the orientation is set the way you want it.

In the Height and Width boxes, PowerPoint accepts measurements in inches , centimeters , or pixels . Type a number followed by a space and then the appropriate abbreviation: in , cm , or px .

PowerPoint then converts measurements, if necessary, to the type of unit your operating system uses.

You can change the unit of measure that is shown in PowerPoint dialog boxes if you like.

Make a default size to start from when creating new presentations

This version of PowerPoint has a default size of 16:9 for new presentation, but you can create a different default for yourself.

Start PowerPoint.

On the File tab of the toolbar ribbon, select New . Then double-click the Blank Presentation to create a new, empty presentation.

Then on the Design tab, click Slide Size and choose the size you want for a default.

(If you want a different default slide size than what's listed there, select Custom Slide Size and then choose your size in the Slide Size dialog box, and then click OK .)

More arrow

Select Save Current Theme .

Give your theme a name that you'll remember easily and click Save . Don't change the folder that the new theme is to be saved in.

On the Design tab, click the More arrow again in the bottom-right corner of the Themes group. You'll see your newly saved theme under a Custom heading.

Right-click that new custom theme under the Custom heading, and then select Set as Default Theme :

Right-click the new theme listed under the "Custom" heading, and then choose "Set as Default Theme".

Close PowerPoint. Don't save any files if it prompts you.

Open PowerPoint again. On the File tab of the toolbar ribbon, select New .

The custom theme that you just saved is listed at the top left corner, named Default Theme . The thumbnail image looks like a widescreen slide, but in reality, when you create a new presentation based on that theme, the presentation has the aspect ratio that you've defined for this default theme.

The next time you open PowerPoint, you'll see your default theme in the upper-left of the theme gallery. When you select it, all the slides will be the custom size you chose by default.

Sizing applies to all slides in a presentation

PowerPoint isn't able to resize one slide within a presentation. All slides in a presentation are the same size.

If this is a feature you’d like to request, please send us your feedback to help us prioritize new features in future updates. See  How do I give feedback on Microsoft 365  for more information.

Orientation applies to all slides in a presentation

PowerPoint isn't able to change the page orientation of certain slides. All slides in a presentation have the same page orientation.

Change the page orientation in PowerPoint between landscape and portrait

Use portrait and landscape slide orientation in the same presentation

Reduce the file size of a picture

On the File menu, select Page Setup .

In the Page Setup dialog box, under Slides sized for , select the predefined size you want, or choose Custom and specify the dimensions you want.

The Slide Size button is at the far right end of the Design tab on the toolbar

Select Slide Size .

Shows the Slide Size button

Select Standard (4:3) or Widescreen (16:9) .

Shows the Slide Size menu

PowerPoint may prompt you about scaling your content. Choose one of the following options:

Scale: Select this option to decrease or increase the size of your slide content. When scaling to a smaller slide size, this could make your content appear smaller, but you’ll be able to see all content on your slide.

Don't Scale: Select this option to maintain the size of your slide content. Choosing this option could result in your content not fitting on the slide.

When you change slide sizes, PowerPoint asks whether to scale your content to fit on the slide.

Choose Page Setup from the menu that appears.

Page Setup gives you an assortment of predefined slide/page size options. The options and their dimensions are listed below:

In the Slide Size box, click the down arrow next to Slides sized for and select an option.

Widescreen sets the dimensions to 13.333 in x 7.5 in.

There are several predefined slide-size options in the Page Setup dialog box

Choose custom dimensions (in inches, centimers, or pixels)

Select Slide Size , and then click Page Setup .

Shows the Page Setup option on the Slide Size menu

The Page Setup dialog box opens.

In the Width and Height boxes, PowerPoint accepts measurements in inches , centimeters , or pixels . Type a number followed by a space and then the appropriate abbreviation: in (inches) or cm (centimeters) or px (pixels).

PowerPoint then converts the measurements, if necessary, to the unit of measurement your operating system uses.

Make a new slide size the default for new presentations

Select Slide Size , and then select Page Setup .

Follow the steps in the prior section to choose the slide size you want.

On the Design tab, click the More arrow below the standard themes.

Shows the More arrow under the standard themes

Click Save Current Theme at the bottom of the window.

Shows the Save Current Theme option on the More menu

Give your theme a name that you'll remember easily and click Save .

On the Design tab, click the More arrow below the standard themes again. You'll see your newly saved theme under Custom .

Shows a new theme in the Custom group

Right-click your new custom theme, and then click Set as Default Theme .

Shows the Set as Default Theme option for a custom theme

The next time you open PowerPoint, you'll see your default theme in the upper-left of the theme gallery. When you select it, all the slides will be the size you chose for your default theme.

Some folks have asked about resizing one slide within a presentation. PowerPoint isn't able to do that. All slides in a presentation are the same size.

Some folks have also asked about changing the page orientation of certain slides. PowerPoint isn't able to do that. All slides in a presentation have the same page orientation.

On the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon, click Slide Size in the Customize group.

Options for slide size are available near the right end of the Design tab of the toolbar ribbon in PowerPoint Online

Click Standard (4:3) or Widescreen (16:9) .

When PowerPoint for the web is unable to automatically scale your content, it prompts you with two options:

Select Maximize to take full advantage of the space available, or select Ensure Fit to make sure that your content fits on the vertical page

The 16:9 widescreen setting is the default value for new presentations you create. When you change the slide size for a presentation, the size you choose only applies to that presentation. 

You can also change the orientation of all the slides in your presentation. See Change the page orientation for instructions.

Slide-size options in PowerPoint Online

Choose custom dimensions

In the Width and Height boxes, type a measurement in inches . PowerPoint doesn't accept measurements outside the minimum and maximum shown below:

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Laura M. Foley Design

Cheat Death by PowerPoint!

What size should my slides be, 16:9 or 4:3?

July 3, 2017 by Laura Foley 2 Comments

Deciding on a slide format used to be easy when there was only one choice. Nowadays, you can choose between 4:3 format or 16:9. What do these numbers mean and which size should you choose for your presentations?

What the numbers mean

The above notation is called the “aspect ratio,” or the ratio of the width to the height of the slide. In the 4:3 aspect ratio, the dimensions are 1024 x 768 pixels (10.67″ x 8″); the height is 3/4 of the width. Back in the Ye Olde Days of PowerPoint, it was your only choice. Why? Because that’s the aspect ratio of actual slides, pictured above, television screens, and early computer monitors.

When high-definition screens came on the scene in the early 2000s, they were built in a 16:10 aspect ratio. But as more and more high-definition screens were manufactured, it became clear that screens with a 16:9 aspect ratio were cheaper to manufacture. So the 16:9 aspect ratio (1920 x 1080 pixels or 13.3″ x 7.5″) became the new standard.

What size should you choose?

From boardrooms to computer monitors to smartphone screens, 16:9 is the default screen aspect ratio so that’s the slide size I always go with. The 16:9 format gives you a lot of slide real estate to play around with! The legacy 4:3 aspect ratio, while still used, creates smaller slides and doesn’t look that great on newer screens.

How do you change an old 4:3 deck to the new 16:9 format?

Oh, this is super-fun to do and you’re a lucky duck if it becomes your job.

To resize your slides go to the Design tab on the ribbon and select Slide Size/Widescreen on the right side of the screen.

slide size

After you select the new size, this window will appear:

Slide scaling window

Now you’re faced with either everything on the slides being stretched out or squished to fill the space. Oh boy! Either way, after you make your selection you’ll need to go through the presentation slide by slide to ensure that everything looks good. This can be fairly straightforward if the creator of the presentation stayed within the template or a real pain in the rear if he/she didn’t. But do go through the deck to ensure that everything looks right.

If you’re a production artist that charges by the hour, reformatting an organization’s slides from 4:3 to 16:9 could be a nice little gig for you!

Other slide sizes for special events

Now, the 16:9 format is great for everyday use but what if you’re designing a presentation for an event? Last year, I was designing slides for a corporate conference where the setup included multiple, massive screens. For that event, the slides measured 52″ x 17″ and had a “leave this space blank” area on the bottom. Each event is different, so if you’re working on slides like these you need to become friends with the AV folks and find out what size slides they recommend for optimal viewing on that particular setup. The last thing you want to see on a gigantic stage are distorted graphics!

Bottom line

Unless you’re told otherwise, use the 16:9 format. You get a lot more space on each slide for your visuals and it’s really the way things are going.

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How to Change Slide Size or Dimensions in PowerPoint

Change slide size or dimenstions in PowerPoint represented by widescreen or standard aspect ratio displayed on screen

Change PowerPoint Slide Size (Widescreen, Standard or Custom)

by Avantix Learning Team | Updated September 7, 2023

Applies to: Microsoft ® PowerPoint ® 2016, 2019, 2021 and 365 (Windows)

You can change the slide size or aspect ratio of a PowerPoint presentation in all versions. The default slide size or dimensions in 2013, 2016, 2019, 2021 or 365 is widescreen (16:9 aspect ratio). You can also enter a custom slide size if you prefer (including entering slide size in pixels). The best time to set slide size is when you first set up your PowerPoint presentation before you add any content. If you change the size later in the process, you may have to deal with distorted pictures and you may also need to adjust the position and size of various objects on slides in Normal View and in the slide master(s) and layouts in Slide Master View.

The most common slide sizes or aspect ratios are typically used as follows:

  • Widescreen or 16:9 aspect ratio is frequently used for onscreen presentations using a projector, monitor or a widescreen TV. Older projectors used the standard aspect ratio but most new projectors are designed for widescreen.
  • Standard or 4:3 aspect ratio is often used if slides are intended to be printed on letter size paper.

Slide size changes affect the entire presentation. You cannot change slide size for single slides.

You should never change slide size just before running a presentation as you may not be satisfied with the results. If you already have a presentation with images and other content, it's also a good idea to change slide size on a copy of the presentation so you can keep the original deck and slide size.

Note: Some Ribbon tabs may appear with slightly different names if you are working with PowerPoint 365 and have a smaller screen or different display settings. Buttons on the Ribbon may appear as icons only and are also affected by screen size and display settings.

Recommended article: How to Reduce the Size of PowerPoint Presentations (10 Ways to Compress Your PowerPoint Decks)

Do you want to learn more about PowerPoint?  Check out our virtual classroom or live classroom  PowerPoint courses >

Regardless of the version of PowerPoint you use, you should go through your slides after you change slide size to be sure you are satisfied with the results. Be sure to check the slide master(s) and layouts in Slide Master View as well.

Change slide size to widescreen or standard

To change slide size to widescreen or standard size:

  • In Normal View, click the Design tab in the Ribbon.
  • Click Slide Size in the Customize group. A drop-down menu appears.
  • Select Widescreen, Standard or another option from the drop-down menu. A dialog box appears with options to maximize content or scale to fit (this dialog appears only if you are moving from a larger to a smaller slide size).
  • Select the desired option.

Slide Size appears on the Design tab in the Ribbon:

Slide Size menu in PowerPoint

The following dialog box appears in PowerPoint to maximize content or scale to fit only when you change slide size to a smaller size (such as widescreen to standard):

PowerPoint dialog box to maximize or ensure fit when changing slide size to a smaller size.

If you select Maximize, the slide content will not be resized when you change to the smaller slide size.

If you select Ensure Fit, PowerPoint will scale your content to fit the smaller slide size.

Change slide size to a custom size

You can use custom slide sizes. Simply choose options from the Slides sized for drop-down menu in the dialog box (such as A4 paper size) or enter custom dimensions.

To change slide size to a custom size:

  • Choose Custom Slide Size from the drop-down menu. A dialog box appears.
  • Select an option from the Slides sized for drop-down menu or enter the desired slide size in the Height and Width boxes.
  • A dialog box appears with options to maximize content or scale to fit (this dialog appears only if you are moving from a larger to a smaller slide size).

Note that the measurement system in PowerPoint dialog boxes is based on your system settings. If you would like to change the measurement system, check out our article on How to Change the Measurement System in PowerPoint.

The following dialog box appears when you select Slide Size and then Custom Slide Size:

PowerPoint Slide Size dialog box to change slide size in 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365.

You can create posters in PowerPoint by entering a custom slide size such as 36 inches wide by 56 inches high or 91.44 cm wide by 142.24 cm high. The maximum slide size in PowerPoint is 56 inches or 142.24 cm. As a best practice, set the slide size before adding content to the poster.

Many PowerPoint users are not aware that you can enter slide size in pixels (simply enter the measurement with px beside the number). This is useful in a number of situations such as using PowerPoint to create social media posts. If you enter slide size in pixels (such as 200px), when you tab to another box or close the dialog box, PowerPoint changes the pixels to the equivalent in the current measurement system.

Deal with issues when changing slide size

When changing slide size in existing presentations with content, 4 common issues occur:

  • Pictures may be distorted as PowerPoint tries to adjust images to fit slide size. Images on slides in Normal View will be affected as well as images on the slide master(s) and layouts. If pictures are distorted, you will need to either manually resize each image or delete them and insert them again.
  • Objects such as placeholders and shapes that have been created in PowerPoint are not in the position you'd like. You may need to move objects or reset one or more slides (on the Home tab in the Ribbon, click Reset in the Slides group).
  • Extra space is created if you change to a larger slide size. You may need to move or resize objects and adjust the slide master(s) or layouts in Slide Master View.
  • If you have changed to a smaller slide size, you may need to increase font size for placeholders and text boxes.

Dimension differences between different slide sizes

In PowerPoint 2013 and later versions, widescreen (16:9) format measurements are different and are set to 13.33 inches wide by 7.5 inches high or 33.867 cm wide by 19.05 cm high. This matches the height of the 4:3 format.

Avoid issues when changing slide size

To avoid issues in PowerPoint related to slide size, you should:

  • Try to set slide size as a first step after you create a presentation and before you have entered any content. In 2013 and later versions, the default is widescreen (16:9 aspect ratio).
  • If you have changed slide size in a presentation with content, review your slides to be sure you are satisfied with the results. You should also check the slide master(s) and layouts in Slide Master View.
  • Never change slide size just before running a presentation as you may not be pleased with the results and you won't have time to fix your slide deck.
  • If you have created a presentation with content, make a copy of the presentation first and change slide size on the copy.

Keep in mind that widescreen is normally used for on screen presentations and standard is often used for printed presentations.

This article was first published on October 6, 2019 and has been updated for clarity and content.

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How-To Geek

How to change slide size in powerpoint.

PowerPoint allows you to change your presentation's slide sizes, which you may need to do to change how your slides are displayed or printed. Here's how.

Quick Links

Changing powerpoint slide sizes, changing to a custom powerpoint slide size.

PowerPoint allows you to format and present the content of your slides in different ways. If you want to print out or display your PowerPoint slides in a bigger or smaller-than-average size, you can change the slide sizes to match.

PowerPoint has two common slide sizes. The first, 4:3, is a good option if you're using older hardware to present your slides. If you're planning on presenting your PowerPoint presentation using a modern projector or display, then the 16:9 slide size should be your preferred choice.

By default, PowerPoint will default to the 16:9 side slide. To print your slides (full size, one per page), you'll likely need to use a custom slide size, rather than one of these options.

Switching to another size is thankfully an easy process---open your PowerPoint presentation to begin and then click the "Design" tab on the ribbon bar.

Press the Design tab on the ribbon bar in PowerPoint

In the "Customize" section of the "Design" tab, select the "Slide Size" button. This will display the two common slide sizes in a drop-down menu.

Click either the "Standard (4:3)" or "Widescreen (16:9)" option to switch all of your PowerPoint slides to that size.

Selecting a slide size in PowerPoint

Unfortunately, it isn't possible to use multiple slide sizes in a PowerPoint presentation. Just as if you were making PowerPoint slides vertical , any changes you make to your PowerPoint slide sizes will apply to all slides.

Related: How to Make Slides Vertical in PowerPoint

It's possible to use a custom PowerPoint slide size if the default 4:3 or 16:9 options are unsuitable. You might choose to use a custom slide size if you're printing full-size PowerPoint slides using a custom page layout, for instance.

To do this, select Design > Slide Size > Custom Slide Size to display the "Slide Size" options menu.

To set a custom PowerPoint slide size, press Design > Slide Size > Custom Slide Size.

Various preset slide sizes, such as A3 or A4 paper sizes, are shown under the "Slides Sized For" drop-down menu.

Select one of these preset options, or set your slide dimensions manually using the "Width" and "Height" option boxes. From there, click the "OK" button to save.

If you're scaling down to a smaller size, PowerPoint will ask you how it should handle any slide content.

Choose "Maximize" if you want the slide contents to remain at a similar scale, but with the risk that some of the content may be cut. Alternatively, click "Ensure Fit" to scale the slide contents down in size to match the new slide size without losing any content.

Choose the "Maximize" or "Ensure Fit" option.

Once saved, the custom slide size you selected will be immediately applied to all of your slides, with slide content being resized or cut to match.

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How to Change Your PowerPoint Slide Size (16:9 vs. 4:3)

  • PowerPoint Tutorials
  • March 10, 2019

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to change your slide size in PowerPoint.

That way you can create slides for any situation including on-screen presentations, printed documents, posters, postcards, handouts, etc.

First off, the two most used PowerPoint slide sizes are:

  • 16:9 ratio  for onscreen presentations and new overhead projectors. This is the default setting for the latest versions of PowerPoint.
  • 4:3 ratio  for printing slides on standard 8.5 x 11 pieces of paper as handouts.

When starting with a blank PowerPoint presentation, changing your slide size is super easy and straightforward. If not, there are a few issues you’ll need to deal with, each covered below.

That’s why it’s worth figuring out what slide size you need BEFORE you build your presentation. If you later convert your presentation to a different size, it can be painful!

It’s just like the old carpenter saying, “measure twice and cut once.” In PowerPoint, you’ll want to “ask twice (to double confirm the required size) and build once.”

Changing your PowerPoint slide size does not make your PowerPoint presentation larger or smaller. To reduce your PowerPoint file size, you need to learn how to compress a PowerPoint presentation .

Table of Contents

How to change your powerpoint slide size.

By default, new PowerPoint presentations start in the 16:9 slide size format.

This is the NEW standard for most modern overhead projects and monitors and is recommended for most presentations. That said, you can easily change your slide size to something else.

To change your PowerPoint slide size, click the Design tab, open the Slide Size dropdown and choose the size for your slide

To change your slide size in PowerPoint, simply:

  • Navigate to the  Design tab
  • Open the  Slide Size  drop down menu
  • Select  4:3 ,  16:9  or  Custom Slide Size  (see options below)

When starting with a blank presentation, you are now good to go. You will not have to worry about any of the conversion issues discussed below.

Notice too, how much wider the 16:9 slide size is versus the 4:3 slide size in the picture below. The new size gives you more room for the content on your slides.

Comparison between the four by three and sixteen by nine slide sizes in PowerPoint

When you are converting an existing presentation to a new slide size, you will additionally be given the following prompt:

“You are scaling to a new slide size. Would you like to maximize the size of your content, or scale it down to ensure it will fit on the new slide?

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Maximize  leaves all your content as is on your slide, even if it no longer fits on the new slide size that you selected.

Ensure Fit  scales down your content in proportion to the new slide size you have selected. You will only see this option when moving from a larger slide size to a smaller one.

Custom PowerPoint slide sizes

Choosing  Custom  for your slide size gives you additional options to work with. Inside the dialog box you can choose your size on the left and your orientation on the right.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

On top of that, you can also input your own custom slide size. However, I recommend using one of the preset PowerPoint dimension options.

  • On-screen show (4:3)
  • Letter Paper (8.5×11 in)
  • A3 Paper (297×420 mm)
  • B4 (ISO) Paper (250×353 mm)
  • B5 (ISO) Paper (176×250 mm)
  • 35mm Slides
  • On-screen Show (16:9)
  • On-screen show (16:10)

For your orientation options on the right-hand side of the dialog box, you can choose between  Landscape  and  Portrait .

In most situations, you will want one of the default settings. Best practice is  Landscape  for your presentation slides and  Portrait  for your printed notes, handouts and outlines.

Comparison of the portrait and landscape orientation for PowerPoint slides

Issues when converting 4:3 to the 16:9 slide size in PowerPoint

When converting an existing 4:3 presentation with content into the 16:9 format, you are not given any conversion options. Instead, PowerPoint simply does the conversion for you, which can create several problems.

There are two issues you will face in the new 16:9 slide size.

When converting from four by three into the sixteen by nine slide size, your images will be stretched and distorted

The first issue is that all the images on your slide master (including company logos) will be stretched to fit the new, larger slide size.

To fix the stretched images, you will need to fix those images (or reinsert them) on your slide master, as if you were creating a PowerPoint template from scratch.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

The second issue you will face in the larger 16:9 slide size is that you will have a lot of extra white space on your slides.

While you can leave the space blank, doing so will make your content look weird. Ideally you don’t want a lot of white empty space like that on your slides. Especially since all your font sizes will be so small.

That’s why if you have the time, I recommend resizing your content to fill in the white space. You can do this by either increasing the font size of your content, or adding additional visuals that support your message.

Issues when converting 16:9 to the 4:3 slide size in PowerPoint​

When converting an existing 16:9 presentation to the 4:3 slide size, you are given the option to either  Maximize  or  Ensure Fit  (both covered below).

1. The Maximize option

This option means that the content on your slides will not be resized to fit the 4:3 slide size. The same is true if you move to any smaller slide size.

when converting from the sixteen by nine to the four by three slide size, none of your content will be properly resized to fit the smaller slide size

Maximize Issue #1:  All the images on your slide master (including your company logo) will be distorted.

You might also have issues with other content placeholders, slide backgrounds or anything else that was built on your slide master.  For these issues, you’ll first need to navigate to your Slide Master. Once you are there, you either adjust (or rebuild) your PowerPoint template so that everything fits properly.

Maximize Issue #2:  Your content will not be scaled down to the smaller slide size. Instead, you’ll have overhanging content as pictured above.

For these kinds of spacing issues, you will need to work through your slides to adjust your content.

One recommendation as you move from the larger 16:9 slide size to 4:3, is to break up your slides. Take the contents from one larger slide and break it into two (or even three) separate slides.

Breaking up your content is preferable to just cramming more content on the smaller slide space. Doing so will make your content easier to read when presented on an overhead projector.

2. The Ensure Fit option

This option means that PowerPoint will scale down your content to fit the smaller slide size based on the size you selected.

when converting from the sixteen by nine to the four by three slide size, your images will be distored and you will have extra white space around the content of your slides

Ensure Fit Issue #1:  Distorted images, slide backgrounds and anything else that PowerPoint had to automatically resize on your slide master.

To fix these issues, you’ll need to navigate to your slide master and adjust (or rebuild) your template to make everything fit.

Ensure Fit Issue #2:  Your content will be scaled down to fit your new slide size, leaving you with a lot of white space. In addition, all your font sizes will be smaller, making them hard to read.

For small content like this, you’ll need to work through your slides and resize your content accordingly. Keep in mind the people at the back of the room too when choosing a new font style and size.

Saving your custom slide size as a PowerPoint theme

If want to use your own custom slide size for all your future PowerPoint presentations, you can save and set it as a PowerPoint theme.

This is a two-step process as discussed below.

1. Save your custom slide size as a theme

To save your custom slide size as a PowerPoint theme, from the Design tab, select save current theme, name the theme and click save

To save your custom slide size (and settings) as your own custom PowerPoint theme, simply:

  • Open the M ore options
  • Click  Save Current Theme
  • Name your Theme (and don’t change the file location it saves to)
  • Click  Save

2. Set your custom theme as the default

To set your custom theme as the default theme, from the design tab, find your custom theme, right-click the theme and select set as default theme

To set a custom PowerPoint theme as the default for all your future presentations, simply:

  • Open the  More options
  • Right-click  your custom theme
  • Select  Set as Default Presentation
  • Close out of PowerPoint (and do not save any presentations if it prompts you)

Once you’ve set your own custom theme as the Default Presentation, it will open every time you start PowerPoint. This saves you from always having to switch your slide sizes.

So that’s how you can change your PowerPoint slide size, either before or after you create your presentation.

And although you are given a lot of flexibility in the slide sizes you can choose from, I recommend using the default slide sizes as used by most people.

It’s also important to remember that switching slide sizes after you have built your presentation can be a total pain. So, to the extent possible, figure out your PowerPoint slide size first before you build out your presentation.

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How to change slide size in PowerPoint 16:9, 4:3 and custom?

  • March 25, 2021

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Trying to change slide size in PowerPoint presentations? PowerPoint lets you choose between a couple of standard slide sizes plus a custom option. In this hints and tips blog post we provide a guide to:

  • The different slide sizes in PowerPoint 16:9, 4:3 and custom sizes
  • How to change a PowerPoint slide size
  • How to change the orientation of PowerPoint slides from landscape to portrait
  • A workaround to change selected slides to portrait for printing

Where to change slide size in PowerPoint?

From the PowerPoint Design tab on the ribbon, select the Slide Size feature button. You can find the slide size feature button on the far right end of the ribbon - refer to the screenshot below.

Screenshot of powerpoint ribbon design tab selecting slide size menu to change slide size

The three slide size options of standard, widescreen and custom will display, as shown in the screenshot below.

screenshot of MS PowerPoint slide size options on design tab

What are the PowerPoint slide size options?

PowerPoint offers three different slide sizes. What's the difference 4:3 vs 16:9 PowerPoint slide sizes? The Standard 4:3 and Widescreen 16:9 both have the same slide width , but have different slide heights:

  • PowerPoint Standard (4:3) Slide Size: This is the original PowerPoint slide size. The standard screen size is easy to print and works well on older style pull down projector screens (when the screen shape is closer to a square than the newer widescreen layout). Powerpoint 4:3 dimensions are 10 in x 7.5 in (which is 33.867 cm x 19.05 cm). Standard PowerPoint slide size pixels = 1024 px x 768px
  • PowerPoint Widescreen (16:9) Slide Size: The PowerPoint 16:9 widescreen option was a later addition but is now the default value in PowerPoint for new presentations. Widescreen is more commonly used now because the size is well suited for presenting on digital screens (typically shaped like elongated rectangles similar to a current TV screen). Powerpoint 16:9 dimensions are 10 in x 5.625 in (33.867 cm x 14.288 cm). Widescreen size 16:9 size ppt dimensions pixels = 1920 px x 1080 px
  • On-screen show (4:3)
  • Letter Paper (8.5x11in)
  • Ledger Paper (11x17in)
  • A3 Paper (297x420mm)
  • A4 Paper (210x297mm)
  • B4 (ISO) Paper (250x353mm)
  • B5 (ISO) Paper (176x250mm)
  • 35mm slides
  • On-screen Show (16:9)
  • On-screen show (16:10)

screenshot of slide size popup menu in powerpoint

You can either select from one of the many options in the drop down list, or you can directly key in your preferred Width and Height for your PowerPoint presentation. As soon as you key in width and/ or height values, the drop down menu will update to show the Custom option.

Note that when you are entering a custom slide size you have the option to specify your PowerPoint size in pixels (e.g. specify pixels for width and height). You can do this by typing in your preferred height and width in pixels using px at the end. The minimum width or height in pixels for PowerPoint slides is 120 px and the maximum width or height is 720 px. When you specify the pixel size of PowerPoint slide, PowerPoint will convert the pixels automatically to your default unit of measurement (e.g. either cm or in).

You can then select the Orientation of the PowerPoint slides. You have the option of Portrait or Landscape orientation and you can select separately for the slides and the Notes, Handouts & Outline.

Can I resize selected slides in a PowerPoint presentation?

No - the PowerPoint resize option is applied to all slides in your presentation. You cannot change size of selected slides in your PowerPoint presentation.

Does PowerPoint auto resize content if slide size changes?

If you select to change the slide size for an existing presentation, PowerPoint will display a slide scaling popup menu. The menu will give you the following options for scaling your slides:

  • Maximise : The maximize size scaling option in PowerPoint will make the content larger, but it may spill over the edges of your slide.
  • Ensure Fit: The ensure fit scaling option in PowerPoint ensures that all content remains visible on the slide, however the content may shrink to ensure that it fits.

Can I change orientation of PowerPoint slides from Portrait to Landscape?

Trying to work out how to change PowerPoint to portrait layout? You can change the orientation of your PowerPoint slides from Landscape to Portrait for the entire presentation, (you cannot change only selected slides in a presentation). To change orientation of PowerPoint slides:

As per the steps above, from the PowerPoint Design tab on the ribbon, select the Slide Size feature button (on the far right end of the ribbon).

Screenshot of powerpoint ribbon design tab selecting slide size menu

The three slide size options will display, as shown in the screenshot below. Irrespective of what size layout you want this time, you need to select the Custom Slide Size option from the PowerPoint ribbon.

From the Slide Size popup menu on the PowerPoint ribbon, you have the option to select Portrait or Landscape mode. You can select the orientation display without modifying your slide size if you already have the correct slide size selected.

You can change the orientation for both your PowerPoint slides and handouts. Note that changing the orientation does not automatically adjust your template (for example your logos will likely appear distorted and the title page of your presentation will look squished). You need to adjust your PowerPoint template separately. If you are changing orientation only for a single PowerPoint presentation, you can do this via your presentation's Slide Master. Or if you plan on creating multiple presentations in the new orientation, its worth spending the extra time to create a new .potx template file suited to the new orientation.

Can you have different orientation slides in a PowerPoint? presentation?

Trying to add a vertical slide in PowerPoint, but keep the rest of the presentation horizontal? Unfortunately it's not possible to have a combination of Portrait and landscape slide orientations in a single PowerPoint presentation. But there is a workaround if you are printing rather than online presenting your PowerPoint presentation.

If you are preparing a PowerPoint presentation that will be printed, a workaround to include different orientation pages in PowerPoint is to create a slide master layout with the orientation on its side. This is a way to rotate PowerPoint slides to Portrait without changing all slides. Refer to the screenshot below for an example.

Screenshot of powerpoint showing slide layout with portrait layout in landscape presentation

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How to adjust slide and shapes by pixel

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Unlike Word, in which you can set the units of measurement, PowerPoint pulls the units of measurement from your computer system. So to change from inches to something else in PowerPoint, you have to make the change in the measurement system settings in Windows Control Panel. Unfortunately your only choices here are US and Metric, so pixels isn't an option.

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Steve Rindsberg

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John SR Wilson

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PowerPoint slides must have some kind of finite resolution or dimension that could be measured in pixels or points though.

The standard 4:3 presentation for example is 1024x768 because if you add a 1024x768 to the presentation it fills the slide 100% with no scaling of the image. Or if you make text 576 points high it fills the slide 100%.

The pixel density of the image has no bearing, PowerPoint just reads the total pixel dimensions.

This is why I don't understand why it uses cm or inches (from the computer's settings) when it is primarily created for on-screen or projectors.

When the slideshow is running it plays full screen irrespective of the res of the playback device right?. For example playing back a 4:3 slideshow on a 1920 x 1080 screen just means that the graphics which are 1024x576 are getting blown up to fit the output screen resolution.

Having said that, if I insert a large image in (like 1920x1080) it is automatically scaled to 50%.

So in that case if a 4:3 show was played back on a 1920x1080 monitor that particular graphic would look crisper as I am guessing it retains its own native resolution (i.e. it's not being down-sampled before playback).

So in terms of actually creating the slides in the first place we should be able to use measurement units like points/pixels. Not centimetres or inches. Using points is probably a better way to think of it as that is how fonts are handled. Makes sense (I hope!).

>> PowerPoint slides must have some kind of finite resolution or dimension that could be measured in pixels or points though. SR:  No, not really.  PPT displays presentations at whatever resolution it finds itself talking to when you start the slide show.   >> The standard 4:3 presentation for example is 1024x768 because if you add a 1024x768 to the presentation it fills the slide 100% with no scaling of the image. Or if you make text 576 points high it fills the slide 100%.   SR:  While this is all true, it doesn't mean much in terms of creating pixel-accurate drawings. There are really two measurement systems at work here:  the slide size, which is sort of imaginary, but usually expressed in inches, and there's the number of pixels PPT tosses out to the video display when you view a slide show. SR:  If you know up front that the display will be, say, 1024x768, then it's fairly easy to make pixel-accurate drawings.  You know that the 10" (or whatever) width will display at 1024 pixels, so each pixel is equivalent to 10/1024.  Do the math, enter the number you want. >> So in terms of actually creating the slides in the first place we should be able to use measurement units like points/pixels. Not centimetres or inches. Using points is probably a better way to think of it as that is how fonts are handled. Makes sense (I hope!). Again, if you know up front what size the display will be, you can enter the equivalent of pixels, or if you set up your slide size to something friendlier, you can make it even simper. Slide size 10.24" / 1024 -->  A very easy number to work with per pixel when entering sizes. ;-) But as soon as that slide gets displayed on a different size projector/monitor, all your pixel calculations go out the window; rather than lead you into thinking it'll work, when in fact it's bound to break, I'm guessing MS decided not to let you used pixels.   You can use points if you prefer.  Instead of entering just a number in any of the size dialog boxes, enter the number followed by pt.  72pt for example rather than 1 inch.            

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How to change the size of slides in Microsoft PowerPoint

The actual size(s) of the slide is less important than the aspect ratio. By default, slides in presentations that you create from the Blank Presentation template are set to Widescreen size.

To change the size of your presentation slides, on the Design tab, in the Customize group, click the Slide Size button and then:

Notes : The Standard slide size:

  • 1600 x 1200
  • 2048 x 1536
  • 2560 x 1920
  • Matches the aspect ratio of standard tablet screens
  • Exactly fills the screen in the Slide pane and when printed on a tablet.

Notes : The Widescreen slide size:

  • 1920 x 1080
  • 2048 x 1152
  • 2560 x 1440
  • Does not match the aspect ratio of standard tablet screens
  • Has empty space above and below when printed on a 4:3 screen.
  • Click Custom Slide Size... :

Custom Slide Size in PowerPoint 365

In the Slide Size dialog box:

Slides sized for drop-down list in PowerPoint 365

  • Choose the slide orientation in the Orientation group.

After choosing the necessary options, click OK . The Microsoft PowerPoint dialog box will show two options on how to scale the existing slides to a new slide size:

Scaling options in PowerPoint 365

Maximize the content size or scale it down to Ensure Fit it on the new slide.

Note : It is impossible to change the size or orientation just for some slides.

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How to compress pictures in the presentation

How to compress pictures in the presentation

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powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

  • Presentation

What is the size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels

onliner content creation team

  • December 14, 2022

powerpoint slide size pixels

Suppose you are a PowerPoint user or a professional PowerPoint presenter. In that case, you may face this question: What are PowerPoint slide size pixels while you are making a presentation, or can you change the size of the presentation window? Do you know what is the best size format for PowerPoint presentation design services ? You are going to find all of these questions answered in this blog post.

powerpoint presentation size in pixels

Table of Contents

What is the size of a PowerPoint slide in pixels?

Microsoft PowerPoint comes with multiple preset slide sizes, which can be customized and used based on the user’s needs. You can even put your feet away and, with the help of the “Custom Slide Size” feature, customize the PowerPoint slide size as you need. After all, you should notice that even when you change PowerPoint slide size or Google Slides dimensions , the slide size in pixels will be different.

The right slide format for your PowerPoint presentation size in pixels:

  • 4:3 is perfect for iPad presentations, as well as for old monitors/projectors.
  • 16:9 is known as the most common size for most modern notebooks and Chromebooks, and also it is the default aspect ratio in PowerPoint settings.
  • 16:10 size is the ideal aspect ratio for presentations in MacBooks and office screens.

How to Adjust the PowerPoint size in pixels?

First, you need to be aware that the standard size for standard displays is 16:9, and for wider screens, it’s 4:3. Well, you are known with the standard PowerPoint dimensions pixels, now it’s essential to understand how to adjust the PowerPoint slide size in pixels . You should click on this task’s “Design” tab, then choose the “Slide Size” option with your mouse.

powerpoint slide size

From this step, just select the desired size of the slide from the appeared dropdown menu. Once the size is determined, the slide will automatically adjust to the new size.

powerpoint size in pixels

Wrong PowerPoint slide size pixels format issues

In some of your PowerPoint presentations, you might have observed that your slides do not cover the entire screen. The reason for this is that the PowerPoint presentation has a different aspect ratio compared to the device used in the creation/opening of the document. The most common problem is the following unevenness in the view.

  • Thin black bands run along the top and bottom areas of the presentation.
  • The size of the slides is reduced on display.
  • Content can be stretched or compressed.
  • Slides may be cut off.

The default aspect ratio on PowerPoint 2013 is set to 16:9 formats. But the display of many other monitors and MacBooks support 16:10. Therefore, you must select an appropriate aspect ratio for your PowerPoint templates. Always take note of the aspect ratio of the device that you wish to use in creating as well as opening your PowerPoint presentation.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

How to change your PowerPoint aspect ratio?

  • Open your PowerPoint presentation; upper the window, you can see the Design tab on the ribbon; select it.
  • Now click on the Slide Size toolbar at the right end to see your choices.
  • Select between Standard (4:3 aspect ratio), Widescreen (16:9), and custom slide size based on your demand.
  • The last step is clicking on OK and choosing the correct scale for your presentation.

NOTE: In PowerPoint 2010, principles are the same as in 2013, except the notice under the Design tab is much messy, and you can’t quickly find the slide size function there.

How to Customize the PowerPoint slide size?

As we mentioned, there is a “ Custom Slide Size” feature in Microsoft PowerPoint for all versions that allows you to change the size of the PPT slide by customization. You can use any demotion by using this feature; follow these steps: 

  • Open your PPT and choose the Design tab from the menu, which is located at the top of the window.
  • Now find the Slide Size in the right side of the Design menu
  • Then select the Custom Slide Size option in the opened window in the design menu and click on it to see a dialog box.
  • Click on the “Slide sized for” option on the opened dialog box to choose the custom option at the bottom of the opened menu.
  • Click on the Width box to enter your preferred slide size in inches. 
  • For Height, do the same as the width and enter the size you want.
  • Now, after adjusting your preferred slide size, click on the OK button to apply changes and save your custom size.

Nowadays, with progressing technology, you need to be familiar with all the features of the tool or application you use daily. This will help us to have a better output in our job and every other part between. PowerPoint is one of the best ways to show and share your work or information with others. You must know the right aspect ratio for your display if you have a projector, MacBook, or laptop. In this article, you learned about the best pixel size for your display to show your presentation in the ideal and perfect possibility to your audience.

What size is a 16:9 PowerPoint slide pixels?

Suppose you are making a 16:9-dimension presentation for widescreen or a presentation projector; the size is 1920 pixels X 1080 pixels . In that case, the image you are going to need for your PPT should be 1920 pixels wide and 1080 pixels high, and the image’s resolution should be approximately 100 – 150 pixels per inch.

What is the PowerPoint size in pixels, 16×9 or 4×3?

One of the first choices is the slide size on PowerPoint designing. Microsoft PowerPoint switched to the 16:9 aspect ratio of presentations in recent years as the default size of slides. It follows the trend of “wide-everything,” including smartphones, computer monitors, TVs, and projectors & beamers.

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PowerPoint Slide Sizes: General Information + Instructions for Resizing a Slide

The customization of standard powerpoint slide sizes.

  • The customization PowerPoint slide dimensions

PowerPoint templates from TemplateMonster

Microsoft PowerPoint is a program that allows you to create unique and creative presentations. This product is perfect for beginners and professionals alike. Microsoft PowerPoint has all the editing tools you would expect from an Office product, as well as an impressive selection of options for presentation, such as transitions and animations. You can also add and edit many other non-text elements such as images, videos, audio, hypertext, and graphics. This guide is about powerpoint slide size.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Overall, PowerPoint is an amazing product. It is user-friendly and easy to use, but with advanced functions that are necessary to make truly professional presentations.

If you want to create a presentation as quickly as possible, without much effort and time spent, then pay attention to PowerPoint presentation templates from TemplateMonster. These are original and unique templates for different purposes and projects.

Now, let’s talk about PowerPoint slide dimensions.

The PowerPoint slides size depends on where and how you show this presentation. For example, it can be a PowerPoint presentation on:

  • laptop screens (most laptop screens have an aspect ratio of 16:9, MacBook 16:10)
  • projectors (many projectors have a 4:3 aspect ratio, while others imitate widescreen laptop monitors)
  • large-format monitors (here the aspect ratio is usually 16:9)

The same PowerPoint file will be displayed differently on each device, as the aspect ratio may vary. Therefore, again, TemplateMonster offers templates that adapt to the size of the screen.

PowerPoint gives the possibility to change the size of the slides for any purpose. Most often, users change the current format to portrait or landscape. This is very easy to do. First, we will tell you how to change the standard PowerPoint slide size. So:

  • Open the PowerPoint presentation, and among the various tabs ( Insert, Transitions, Animations, Slide Show, etc.) select the Design tab.
  • Here you will see the themes, their variants, and Format Background . You should click Slide Size . In PowerPoint 2016, this button is located in the last field that is called Customize . In other versions of PowerPoint, Slide Size can be found in Page Settings .
  • By clicking on Slide Size , you will see a menu with Standard (4:3) and Widescreen (16:9) options. The variant will be selected here depending on your presentation.

Here is the example:

powerpoint change slide size

Basically, this is all about changing the standard PowerPoint slide size.

Powerpoint templates

The customization of PowerPoint slide dimensions

Next, we would like to share with you a quick guide on how to set up the exact dimensions for your slides. To do this, you need to take some similar actions that were specified above, namely:

monsterone powerpoint bundle

  • Open the PowerPoint presentation, and select the Design tab .
  • Among the suggested options, click Slide Size .
  • Next, you need to select the Custom Slide Size . This will bring up a special window where you can select Slide Size for Width, Height, Number Slides From, Orientation, Notes, handouts & outline.
  • In the Slide Size for box, you can choose from a variety of predefined slide sizes. For example A3, A4, B5, Letter Paper, Overhead, Custom, Banner, etc.
  • Next, in the Height and Width , you can customize the desired size for your presentation, or project.
  • At the end, click OK , and the changes will be saved and applied to your slides.

slide size click ok

After resizing PowerPoint slides, be sure to check everything, and make certain that the elements of the presentation are within its scope. Keep yourself out of trouble.

The PowerPoint slide is both a normal page (absolute values measured in centimeters) and a screen form (values measured in pixels). You can specify the height and width of the slide in inches, centimeters, and pixels. For PowerPoint slide size pixels, you need to specify the desired size and add “px” in the column with numbers. If you want to specify the size in inches you must add “in,” and if centimeters then “cm.” PowerPoint then converts the sizes (if it is necessary) into the type of units used by the operating system.

We would also like to clarify that the PowerPoint slide sizes in pixels can be 1366 x 768; 1280 x 720; 1024 x 600; 640 x 480.  The larger the size - the better the quality.

Since we've already figured out the issue of PowerPoint slide sizes, we now offer you a list of the best PowerPoint templates from TemplateMonster.

2019 Pitch Deck PowerPoint Template

2019 Pitch Deck PowerPoint Template

2019 Pitch Deck PowerPoint Template is truly one of the best templates that TemplateMonster offers. Among the most important features:

  • over 200 unique, fresh and stylish slides
  • 12 additional color schemes (you can customize the colors, and choose the appropriate scale for you)
  • 16:9 HD aspect ratio, ideal for wide screens
  • additional instructions that you can use to quickly and easily set up the template
  • fully customizable and editable PowerPoint template elements
  • 24/7 technical support
  • bright and memorable slides with graphs, diagrams, tables, etc.

We advise you to consider this alternative!

Infographic PowerPoint Template

Infographic PowerPoint Template

Infographic PowerPoint Template is a cool example of a powerful template for presenting any business project. Choosing this template you will get more than 600 unique, and professional templates, 2 aspect ratio (4:3 and 16:9), a huge number of vector icons, a wide variety of color schemes (you even have the opportunity to choose your favorite colors, and create schemes), additional and free fonts, calendars, maps, graphs, tables, various types of diagrams, schemes, and columns. There are also many available layouts. All elements are fully customizable. The quality of the slides is at the highest level, so you will not have any problems in working with this template.

Multipurpose Business Infographic Presentation - PowerPoint Template

Multipurpose Business Infographic Presentation - PowerPoint Template

Multipurpose Business Infographic Presentation is also one of the best PowerPoint templates available. It includes a huge number of unrealistically cool elements, such as:

  • 30,000 slides, approximately 500 of which are unique and stylish
  • more than 20 color schemes that can be easily edited
  • the presence of a light and dark version of the template
  • easily customizable elements
  • unusual graphs, charts, tables
  • a huge number of fonts and maps that can be used for free access
  • different vector icons, and more

Albireo Powerpoint Template PowerPoint Template

Albireo Powerpoint Template PowerPoint Template

Another variant of the best template is the Albireo PowerPoint Template . This is a huge collection of slides with different charts, maps, tables, schemes, and diagrams. This PowerPoint presentation template is perfect for presenting business projects or reports. This theme is available in light and dark formats. You will also receive more than 5 ready-made color schemes, free fonts, 24/7 technical support, additional instructions, and information about setting up and using the template.

Redline Creative PowerPoint Template

Redline Creative PowerPoint Template

Redline Creative PowerPoint Template is also a great example of a template for any kind of presentation. Redline Creative has a fairly large number of bright, high-quality, and memorable templates. By choosing this template, you will get access to Google maps and fonts, additional bonus icons, unusual charts, schemes, and diagrams. In this template you can easily change the color, the position of the elements on the page, the size of these elements, etc. You can also use ready-made slide layouts. Redline Creative is an easy to use a theme to present any of your plans, ideas, and projects!

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Unravelling PowerPoint picture size and resolution

  • Written by: Jamie Garroch
  • Categories: PowerPoint design , PowerPoint productivity
  • Comments: 6

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

If you come from a print media background you’ll be familiar with the importance of image resolution and how it affects quality. If you come from a web design environment you might be more familiar with pixels. But when it comes to PowerPoint, there’s an odd mix of measurements from the physical and digital worlds even though the majority of what is produced is shown on either a monitor or a projector. So what do presentation professionals need to know about picture size and resolution?

Pictures are made of dots

OK, so this might not be the most exciting news headline but we need to start from the beginning. A raster or bitmap picture (contrary to a vector image) is made up of thousands of tiny dots or pixels. Each of these dots is a single colour and the number of dots affects the file size of the picture. The image below shows how pixels are used to form an image. The first shows the image at a normal scale:

Image of stopwatch at 1280x720 at 96 DPI

But when we zoom in you can clearly see each individual pixel that makes up the picture:

zoomed in image of stopwatch

When you resize pictures in PowerPoint beyond their original 100% size, extra pixels have to be ‘invented’ by PowerPoint through a process of interpolation. This can cause pictures to appear blurry and degrade the quality of your slide show when displayed on a monitor or projector. In addition to the size of the picture in pixels, some image editors set a DPI (Dots Per Inch) parameter. This is usually only applicable for printed media and defines how many pixels (dots) are crammed into each inch. But PowerPoint does take DPI into account as you’ll see later.

So there are two aspects of a picture you need to be aware of:

Size : the number of pixels horizontally by the number of pixels vertically. This affects file size.

Resolution : the density of pixels per inch. This does not affect file size.

Points vs. Pixels

To add to the complexity of picture size and resolution, PowerPoint measures picture sizes in points under the hood and then converts them into your preferred measurement system, inches or centimetres, before displaying them in the user interface:

PowerPoint UI screenshot of picture inserted size

Points may mean prizes in game shows but in PowerPoint, points are not equivalent to prizes nor pixels. A point is actually 0.75 of a pixel on a 96 DPI monitor which comes from 96 DPI / 72 PPI ( dots or pixels per inch versus points per inch). The 96 number comes from the resolution of your monitor (more on that later) and 72 comes from the world of typography where a point is a physical unit of distance. A point (pt) is equal to 1/12 Pica, and 1 Pica = 1/6 inch. Hence 1 pt = 1/72 inch, meaning 1 inch contains 72 points. Phew!

Let’s see this in practice when examining a standard 16:9 widescreen slide in PowerPoint. If you click the Design tab followed by Slide Size and choose Custom Slide Size , you’ll see the size of your slide in either inches or centimetres:

screenshot of PowerPoint slide size pop up window

Inches are actually easier to deal with here because you’re going to see conversions using DPI or Dots Per Inch. In the above example the slide has a size of 13.333 x 7.5 inches. Now, because there are 72 points per inch (don’t get this confused with dots per inch!) this translates to 960 (13.333 x 72) by 540 (7.5 x 72) points . This is what’s used to scale your picture as it’s inserted into your slide. That then translates to 1280 (960 / 0.75) by 720 (540 / 0.75) dots or pixels and that is what is used to project your picture during a slide show.

A little known secret is that regardless of the measurement system set on your computer, you can actually enter dimensions for your slide setup and/or objects on your slide by typing in a number followed by px for pixels or pt for points. As soon as you hit return, the number is converted to your default units of measurement. So entering 1in, 2.54cm, 72pt or 96px all yield the same result. Go ahead and try it!

Now, let’s take a look at what happens when you insert pictures into your slides at various sizes and resolutions.

Below are the settings for the stopwatch picture which we’ve scaled to 960 x 540 pixels at 72 DPI. Most decent image editor apps will allow you to set both the size and resolution and in this example we used the free GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) app which is available for both Windows and Mac.

screenshot of GIMP scale settings

When it’s inserted into the slide it occupies the full slide size and PowerPoint has kept it scaled at 100%. This is because we have the same number of pixels in the picture as there are points for the slide and the image is set to 72DPI:

screenshot of picture inserted into PowerPoint at 72dpi

You’ll get the same result if you rescale the source picture in your preferred image editor to 1280 x 720 pixels, but at 96DPI. This is because PowerPoint scales it by the ratio of 72/96 or 0.75.

Making this picture larger than the slide or projecting it at anything bigger than HD720p can cause it to become blurry.

If you now insert the same picture scaled to HD1080P (1920 x 1080 pixels) at 72DPI you’ll see that it’s automatically scaled down in PowerPoint to 50% of its original size or ¼ the size of HD1080P so that it fits on the slide:

screenshot of HD1080p picture inserted into PowerPoint at 72dpi

In this case, even though the picture has been scaled to the slide size all of the pixel data is still there for use when projecting. That means you can display or project this slide at a maximum size of HD1080P without any degradation of the picture.

screenshot of two pictures inserted into PowerPoint

If you were to project at a higher size such as 4k or 8k HD, there’s a chance that the projected image will not be pin-point sharp. This depends on the image interpolation algorithms in use by the combination of PowerPoint, your graphics card and the projector. If you insert the same picture at HD1080p size but with the DPI set to 144, it’ll get inserted at 100% scale and fit the slide exactly.

When looking at file size, it’s clear to see that it’s the number of pixels in the file that makes the difference and that the DPI setting does not impact file size at all. This is the relevant information in Windows Explorer for our test pictures:

screenshot of picture sizes in Windows Explorer

So what have you learned?

  • That the DPI setting within a picture file is used to scale the picture as it’s inserted onto the slide but it has no impact on the projected quality nor the size of the picture file.
  • 960 x 540 pixels at 72 DPI
  • 1280 x 720 pixels at 96 DPI
  • The second picture will have a larger file size as it contains more pixel data.

Monitor Scaling

Now you know how DPI has an impact on pictures in PowerPoint, you might be asking yourself how does the Windows scaling affect all of this? When you change the scale factor in Windows Settings what is essentially happening is that the display DPI is being changed. You might have one HD1080p monitor set to 100% scale and another set to 200%. The corresponding monitor DPI values for these are:

  • 100% = 96DPI
  • 200% = 192DPI

This means that there are twice as many dots/pixels in use on the second monitor. The impact on PowerPoint is therefore that you need twice as many pixels in the image to display it optimally, irrespective of the DPI setting in the picture file. That means taking your HD1080p picture and sourcing a 4k version of it, which is 3840 x 2160 pixels.

Other PowerPoint Considerations

If you dig around in PowerPoint you’ll find a couple of other features that affect picture quality. The first is in the ribbon and the second is in the backstage.

Compress Pictures is found in the ribbon when you have a picture selected and you click the Format Picture tab:

screenshot of PowerPoint Format Picture tab Adjust group

This open a window that allows you to compress the currently selected picture or all pictures in your presentation:

screenshot of PowerPoint Compress Pictures dialog

You can click the ? icon in this window for lots more detail from Microsoft on what each of these settings does but basically, the Resolution section scales the image down to the set ppi (ppi here means dpi not points per pixel!). It doesn’t scale beyond the current DPI setting of the image because this implies creating new pixel data, which is why you’ll see some options greyed out.

You might think that PowerPoint is just changing the DPI setting in the image but it’s not. It also changes the size of the image in pixels. To test this we took the original stopwatch picture sized to 2048 x 1203 at 330DPI. Using the compress pictures tool, the picture was set to the Web (150 ppi) setting. We then used the free BrightSlide Export Media Files to observe the result in Windows Explorer:

screenshot of PowerPoint after Compress Picture

As you can see, the resolution was indeed changed from 300 to 150 but the pixel count changed too, by an ratio of 1:2.2 (330/150). PowerPoint did this so that the picture on the slide remained the same physical in/cm size.

This is obviously a destructive process as pixels are deleted from the picture so use it with care. Also destructive is the option to delete cropped areas which deletes all the picture data outside of your cropping mask.

The other place you’ll see DPI is in the backstage when you click File / Options / Advanced , which corresponds to the Use default resolution option in the widow above. How convenient!

screenshot of PowerPoint default picture resolution

Maximum Size

While you’re learning all about slide and picture sizes, let’s complete the picture (sorry!) by covering the topic of maximum slide size. You might want to know this if you’re printing your creation onto a large format printer or displaying it on a monster projector. Currently, the maximum size for a PowerPoint slide is as follows:

56 x 56 in   |   142.24 x 142.24 cm   |   4032 x 4032 points   |   5376 x 5376 pixels

Conclusion & Recommendation

Pictures in PowerPoint can be tricky to get to grips with. Choosing the right size has an impact on both the file size of your presentation and the maximum monitor/projection size you can use without degrading quality. In general, if you’re projecting at a maximum size of HD1080p, make sure you’re using pictures that are created at 1920 x 1080 pixels in size. Set the DPI to 144 if you want them to be inserted into your slide at 100% scale but remember that the DPI setting doesn’t itself impact file size or the quality of your image or how it’s projected during your slide show. Only pixels do that.

powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Jamie Garroch

Principal technical consultant, related articles, how to consistently brand graphs and charts across microsoft office.

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powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

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powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

Thanks Jamie. A helpful article

I have a related question to help complete my understanding. Suppose you have a screen resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels with PowerPoint slides sized set to match. What happens if you insert a picture with larger Pixel Dimensions eg 3840x 2160 pixels and then ‘Scale’ the picture to fit in the slide? Is the image ‘resampled’ down by removing pixels or is the image scaled down by shrinking existing pixels (which i imagine doesn’t make sense as presumably you can’t shrink pixels below the native pixel size for the screen) ? Similarly, if you inserted a smaller picture of eg 480 x 270 pixels and then ‘Scale’ up to fill the slide, are pixels added or are the existing pixels ‘stretched/made larger ?

Hope that makes sense and thanks for your help,

Hi Campbell. Great question! It depends on what is set for the file in File / Options / Advanced / Image Size and Quality. Take a look at the mouse hover tips for the options “Do not compress images in a file” and “Default resolution” for the answers to your questions.

Thanks for taking the time to reply to my question. The mouse hover ‘tips’ help explain what happens when the file is saved but I still have the same question when changing the size of the image on screen up/down before it is saved. I.e do you know if the images are ‘re-sampled’ by adding/deleting pixels or are existing pixels somehow stretched/shrunk. I hope that makes sense and thanks again for your help.

Useful. I did not realize ppt respects a units suffix in setting sizes in the Format pane.

I do not understand why Microsoft can’t make this app use pixels for the default dimensions. PPT is used for on-screen presentations at least 95% of the time, and yet they continue to use inches. Also, there is no easy way to see if an image (especially one used as a background image in a shape) is 100%.

For the type of picture you have, use JPG, not PNG. PNG is great for screenshots, but not “natural” images.

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Correct PowerPoint Aspect Ratio: 4:3 or 16:9

Nov 16, 2015 | Articles , How-To

4:3 presentation on 16:9 monitor

During the day I had a business meeting and when I arrived back at the hotel in the evening, I immediately noticed that the professional video playback was replaced by a simple PowerPoint slideshow. The presentation welcomed a specific company to the bar of the hotel, for a kind of reception or celebration of something. The contrast between that initial video and now this PowerPoint presentation, could not have been bigger.

  • First of all was this PowerPoint, that was set up like so many people do with PowerPoint. They use PowerPoint like Microsoft Word. Start with an empty white sheet, add a title, add some text as bullets and optionally, insert a picture to the right of it. 70% of the PowerPoint presentations are built like that.
  • The second problem that I noticed, was a professional earthquake. The slideshow was set up as a standard size of 4:3 on a wide screen 16:9 television screen. You recognize this problem when you see those black bars at the left and at the right of the slideshow, in order to equally center the slideshow on the larger screen or resolution.

The first problem can be fixed by investing in a professional PowerPoint design agency or freelancer. Let them set up a PowerPoint template with your logo, a given font, your style and so on. Force everyone in your company to start with this template. It is so much easier to start off with a good template. Don’t trust yourself with the promise that the white presentation will be enhanced later on when you have time. Don’t fool yourself. The second problem can be easily fixed. When you start with a new presentation, you will first have to know; what is the aspect ratio of the device where I will show my slideshow or presentation? When you don’t know the aspect ratio, don’t start with the presentation. Changing the aspect ratio after the design of the presentation, could easily ruin your design. There are two commonly used aspect ratio’s:

presentation design on different monitors

  • Wide screen aspect ratio, or 16:9 screens. Since a year of 5, almost all computer screens are wide screens, with the resolution aspect ratio of a television screen. The current HD computer screens have a resolution of 1920 pixels in width by 1080 pixels in height.

PowerPoint followed this evolution. From the beginning, a new PowerPoint presentation was created with a 4:3 slide setup. Since PowerPoint 2013, a new presentation is now created with 16:9 slides. So when people are still using PowerPoint 2010 nowadays, they tend to always create 4:3 presentations, for playback on the recent 16:9 television screens. People still use PowerPoint 2010 while you can’t buy 4:3 monitors anymore. This results in the slide show aspect ratio problem, as I experienced at this hotel. So as an AV professional, let me teach the 2 things that the user should know before start typing the first words on the slides . Both are related to the device where the user will run the slideshow:

  • Check the orientation of the screen. Most common orientation is landscape like a television screen. But there are exceptions; at shopping malls, airports and exhibition halls, the user often see television screens in portrait mode.
  • Know the resolution of the playback device and see if it is a standard monitor or wide-screen monitor.

When the user knew the orientation and size of the playback device, the user can start with the presentation. In PowerPoint, click File , New , Blank Presentation from the menu. Then click the  Design tab and click on the Slide Size button.

open powerpoint presentation resolution settings

Here the user can choose between a portrait or landscape orientation and set the width in pixels or inches or centimeters. Now with these correct settings, you can add slides and add your messages. Remember not to start with those empty white slides like in a Microsoft Word document and be creative. Good luck…

10 Ways to Optimize PowerPoint for Information Screens

Common mistake: wrong aspect ratio used at information screens

common mistake; wrong aspect ratio info screen

10 Comments

Michael Groth

Sorry, but this is no solution because placed images, like company logos, become distorted!

admin

That is completely correct Michael. Doing this action on an existing presentation, has an influence on the images. That is also stipulated in the article that you always know upfront the orientation and the resolution of the final output device BEFORE you start a presentation. When you don’t know the resolution, then you best have to create a 4:3 and a similar 16:9 presentation, to serve both most important aspect ratios.

Smithd171

That is some inspirational stuff. Never knew that opinions could be this varied. Be certain to keep writing.

longrifle

Our client requires full-size landscape hard-copy handouts on letter-size paper (8-1/2″ x 11″) which of course is 4:3 in addition to 16:9 presentation slides. So we prepare both aspects for them and bill accordingly!

Amit Farkade

Thanks fot this post.It’s a helpful information for professional presentations desigency. wwww.powerpoint.geek

sara

Thanks for this post. It’s a helpful information for professional presentations.

Barrykane

iDealshare VideoGo also works great to convert 4:3 to 16:9 by Click “Setting…” -> Advanced ->Aspect Ratio where you can directly overwrite the original 4:3 aspect ratio to 16:9 or directly select 16:9 as the final aspect ratio.

Admin

Thanks for bringing this to our attention!

john smith

longrifle, not true, 11 x 8.25 is 4:3, if you insert an 11 x 8.5 background on a standard ppt deck, it will not fit.

Sorry but I can’t reproduce what you are saying here. And your valid email address is needed for a dialog so that you get notifications:-)

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Slide Size Differences in PowerPoint

Find out how an additional decimal digit makes a big difference in setting custom file sizes in different versions of PowerPoint. This sort of information will help you avoid a tricky situation.

Author: Geetesh Bajaj

Product/Version: PowerPoint

OS: Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X

Date Created: April 1, 2016 Last Updated: August 14, 2023

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Learn how you can use presets in Shape Styles in PowerPoint and Microsoft Office.

Have you ever wanted to use PowerPoint as a graphic program to create posters, digital scrapbooks, web-banner ads, YouTube cover art, etc.? You will then have run into some limitations, especially when you try to export a PowerPoint slide to a picture with exact size dimensions. In this tutorial, we will explore how a small improvement that Microsoft added in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows and newer versions is providing significant returns.

In older versions of PowerPoint, you could only use two decimal points after a number unit, such as 13.67 inches. However, in recent versions, you can use three decimal points, as in 13.666 inches. You may wonder why so much fuss about an extra decimal point? Why is this so important?

There is a big reason for this fuss. It is important that the graphic file that you export from the PowerPoint slide needs to be an exact, accurate size. This “exact size” part worked a little flaky for PowerPoint 2010 users.

Let’s use YouTube’s cover art as an analogy to explain this better. YouTube cover art is what you see before you play the video. This sort of cover art is also called custom thumbnail, poster frame, and some other names. The moot point here is that YouTube specifies that the dimensions need to be 1280x720 . How will you create a graphic of those exact dimensions in PowerPoint?

Unfortunately, you need to be a math geek to get this right. But we are here to help you, and this is easier than many believe it to be.

So how do 1280x720 pixels translate in terms of inches or centimeters that PowerPoint uses to define slide aspect ratios?

  • To change the pixel value to inches, you need to divide the actual pixel value by 96.
  • To change the pixel value to centimeters, you need to divide the actual pixel value by 37.79.

Why do you need inches and/or centimeters? It depends upon the Regional Settings in your version of Windows. Depending upon what is set, you will see only inches or centimeters in your PowerPoint dialog boxes.

Anyway, we have made it simple for you to determine the actual size you want your slide to be, via this online calculator. Enter the pixel width and height of the graphic you want to create in PowerPoint (cells are colored yellow), and you can find out the results in inches (cells colored orange) and/or centimeters (cells colored blue). Make a note of these dimensions.

If we entered 1280 and 720 for the Width and Height values, our inch dimensions would be 13.333 and 7.500.

Now let us explore how this works in both PowerPoint 2010 and 2013 for Windows. Let us begin with PowerPoint 2010 for Windows .

  • Create a new blank presentation, and then access the Design tab of the Ribbon . Click the Page Setup button to bring up a dialog box of the same name, as shown in Figure 1 , below.

Page Setup in PowerPoint 2010

  • You will notice that we changed the value to Custom in the Slides sized for box, as shown highlighted in red within Figure 1 , above. Also do note that PowerPoint 2010 does allow adding a value like 13.333 with three decimal places, as shown highlighted in blue within Figure 1 . For now, we will click the OK button.
  • Next, access the Page Setup dialog box again, as shown in Figure 2 , below. Notice that the number 13.333 is now changed to 13.33, as shown in the area highlighted in blue . You might think that this will not make a difference, but it does because if you export any slide from this presentation as a picture , you will end up with 1279x720 pixels rather than 1280x720 pixels!

Three decimal digits changed to two

Let us now replicate the above steps in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows and higher:

  • Create a new blank presentation, and then access the Design tab of the Ribbon . Click the Slide Size button to bring up a drop-down menu. Within this menu, choose the Custom Slide Size option, as shown in Figure 3 , below.

Custom Slide Size option

  • Doing so brings up the Slide Size dialog box, shown in Figure 4 , below.

Slide Size in PowerPoint 2013

  • You will notice that we changed the value to Custom in the Slides sized for box, as shown highlighted in red within Figure 4 , above. Also do note that PowerPoint 2013 does allow adding a value like 13.333 with three decimal places, as shown highlighted in blue in Figure 4 . For now, we will click the OK button.
  • Now even if you access the same Slide Size dialog box again, your three decimal digits will be preserved. This in itself is a big difference between PowerPoint 2013 or newer versions such as 365, 2021, 2019, and 2016 and older versions such as PowerPoint 2010. Also, if you now export your slides to a graphic file format newer versions of PowerPoint , the resultant slide will be an exact 1280x720 pixels!

People Also Ask:

What is the difference between 4x3 and 16x9 in powerpoint.

Since 2013, PowerPoint changed the default slide size from 4x3 to 16x9. The older 4x3 size owes its existence to the hardware available in those times, such as 4x3 TV screens and computer display monitors of the same proportions. With the move to 16x9, users moved from the standard 4x3 resolution to the new widescreen 16x9 resolution.

How do I change the size of slides in Microsoft PowerPoint?

To change the size of slides within your PowerPoint presentation, you must access the Design tab of the Ribbon. Next, locate the Customize group, and click on the Slide Size button. The resulting drop-down list will provide some pre-defined sizes.

Which aspect ratio is the best for PowerPoint slides?

The 4:3 aspect ratio, also known as the Standard aspect ratio is best suited for Apple iPads, older computer monitors, and some TV screens. This ratio works best for prints of 8x6 inches or online graphics that use the 1024x768 pixels dimensions. The 16:9 aspect ratio, also known as the Widescreen aspect ratio is suitable for most new smartphones, HD televisions and computer displays. This ratio is best for graphics that need 1920x1080 or 1280x720 pixels dimensions.

01 01 02 - Slides: Slide Size Differences in PowerPoint (Glossary Page)

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  2. What is the size of a powerpoint slide in pixels

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  3. Changing Slide Dimensions in PowerPoint

    powerpoint slide dimensions pixels

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  5. Size of a powerpoint slide in pixels

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COMMENTS

  1. What is the Size of a PowerPoint Slide in Pixels?

    The standard size of a PowerPoint slide is 1024×768 pixels and the widescreen PowerPoint slide is "1920×1080" pixels. It can also be adjusted based on your preferences or the requirements of the platform on which you plan to present your slides.

  2. Change the size of your slides

    Learn how to choose the slide size for your PowerPoint presentations, from Standard (4:3 aspect ratio) to Custom (inches, centimeters, or pixels). Find the predefined sizes and the pixel dimensions for different formats, such as A3, B4, and Overhead.

  3. What Are the Right Dimensions for PowerPoint Slides? (+ Video)

    (Video) Are you unsure of how to set up PowerPoint dimensions? The wrong dimensions can have a very real impact on the success of your presentation. Before you connect to a big screen monitor or projector to share your hard work, check the size and aspect ratio of your presentation.

  4. How to change the PowerPoint Slide Size: All you need to know

    Standard (4:3) - click or tap on this option to get slides of 10 x 7.5 inches or 25.4 x 19.05 cm. Widescreen (16:9) - press to get slides of 13.33 x 7.5 inches or 33.867 x 19.05 cm.

  5. What size should my slides be, 16:9 or 4:3?

    In the 4:3 aspect ratio, the dimensions are 1024 x 768 pixels (10.67″ x 8″); the height is 3/4 of the width. Back in the Ye Olde Days of PowerPoint, it was your only choice. Why? Because that's the aspect ratio of actual slides, pictured above, television screens, and early computer monitors.

  6. PowerPoint Slide Dimensions: A 5-Minute "How To" Guide

    This is also 1024 x 768 pixels at 96dpi. There are ways to widen the slide, make it smaller, and customize the dimensions to fit exactly what you're looking for. Keep in mind that when you project the PowerPoint on to an overhead or a screen, you can adjust the size of the slides at this point, too.

  7. Set PowerPoint Slide Size in Pixels

    143 Share 9.3K views 6 years ago In this PowerPoint quick tip video, I show you how to adjust slide and shapes by pixels. You can set the PowerPoint slide size in pixels, as well as...

  8. How to Change Slide Size or Dimensions in PowerPoint

    The default slide size or dimensions in 2013, 2016, 2019, 2021 or 365 is widescreen (16:9 aspect ratio). You can also enter a custom slide size if you prefer (including entering slide size in pixels). The best time to set slide size is when you first set up your PowerPoint presentation before you add any content.

  9. How to Change Slide Size in Powerpoint

    To do this, select Design > Slide Size > Custom Slide Size to display the "Slide Size" options menu. Various preset slide sizes, such as A3 or A4 paper sizes, are shown under the "Slides Sized For" drop-down menu. Select one of these preset options, or set your slide dimensions manually using the "Width" and "Height" option boxes.

  10. How to Change Slide Size in PowerPoint (Step-by-Step)

    Select 4:3 , 16:9 or Custom Slide Size (see options below) When starting with a blank presentation, you are now good to go. You will not have to worry about any of the conversion issues discussed below. Notice too, how much wider the 16:9 slide size is versus the 4:3 slide size in the picture below.

  11. How to change slide size in PowerPoint 16:9, 4:3 and custom?

    Powerpoint 4:3 dimensions are 10 in x 7.5 in (which is 33.867 cm x 19.05 cm). Standard PowerPoint slide size pixels = 1024 px x 768px; PowerPoint Widescreen (16:9) Slide Size: The PowerPoint 16:9 widescreen option was a later addition but is now the default value in PowerPoint for new presentations. Widescreen is more commonly used now because ...

  12. How to adjust slide and shapes by pixel

    How to adjust slide and shapes by pixel - Microsoft Community PB Private Browser Created on April 9, 2013 How to adjust slide and shapes by pixel I would like to adjust the size and position of the shapes I use in my slides by pixels instead of inches, and the same goes for the slides. How can I change the scaling options from inches to pixel?

  13. How to change the size of slides in Microsoft PowerPoint

    1920 x 1080 2048 x 1152 2560 x 1440 Does not match the aspect ratio of standard tablet screens Has empty space above and below when printed on a 4:3 screen. Click Custom Slide Size...: In the Slide Size dialog box: From the Slides sized for drop-down list, you can choose pre-defined popular sizes:

  14. How to Change the Size of Slides in Microsoft PowerPoint

    Go to the Design tab. Click Slide Size in the Customize section of the ribbon. Choose Custom Slide Size on Windows or PowerPoint on the web or Page Setup on Mac. Use the Slides sized for a drop ...

  15. How to change slide size in PowerPoint

    In the Design tab choose Slide Size. The highlighted box shows the current dimensions of your slides. In the Slide Size drop down, select Custom Slide Size. Select the slide size you want to use. Step-by-step: To know what to change, you need to know where you're starting. When you open a brand new PowerPoint file, the standard slide ...

  16. Impact Of PowerPoint Slide Size Pixels On Presentations

    First, you need to be aware that the standard size for standard displays is 16:9, and for wider screens, it's 4:3. Well, you are known with the standard PowerPoint dimensions pixels, now it's essential to understand how to adjust the PowerPoint slide size in pixels.

  17. PowerPoint Slide Sizes: General Information + Instructions for Resizing

    By clicking on Slide Size, you will see a menu with Standard (4:3) and Widescreen (16:9) options. The variant will be selected here depending on your presentation. Here is the example: powerpoint change slide size

  18. Unravelling PowerPoint picture size and resolution

    To add to the complexity of picture size and resolution, PowerPoint measures picture sizes in points under the hood and then converts them into your preferred measurement system, inches or centimetres, before displaying them in the user interface:

  19. Best Resolution For PowerPoint Presentations • PresentationPoint

    By default, the size of the new presentation in PowerPoint, is currently a widescreen type presentation, 13.333 inch by 7.5 inch. Mostly you will have 96 dots per inch (dpi) on your screen settings, so this means that a default PowerPoint presentation has a resolution of 1280 by 720 pixels.

  20. Correct PowerPoint Aspect Ratio: 4:3 or 16:9

    Think about the screen resolution of 800 pixels by 600 pixels. The aspect ratio (the relation of the horizontal pixels compared to the number of vertical pixels), is 4 by 3. Another common screen resolution with 4:3 aspect ratio; 1280 horizontal pixels results in 960 pixels on a vertical line. Wide screen aspect ratio, or 16:9 screens.

  21. Slide Size Differences in PowerPoint

    Figure 4: Slide Size in PowerPoint 2013; You will notice that we changed the value to Custom in the Slides sized for box, as shown highlighted in red within Figure 4, above. ... This ratio works best for prints of 8x6 inches or online graphics that use the 1024x768 pixels dimensions. The 16:9 aspect ratio, also known as the Widescreen aspect ...

  22. How to Change Powerpoint Slide Size to Pixels

    In this video, I'm going to show you a PowerPoint hack that will help you to set PowerPoint slide size in pixels super fast. Therefore you will be able to us...

  23. What's the pixel dimensions of a presentation slide for Open Office

    Powerpoint works in a completely different unit than pixels so if you look at the standard presentation.xml within the .pptx file you'll see this line that defines the standard slide size: p:sldSz type="screen4x3" cy="6858000" cx="9144000"/ This 9144000x6858000 size is the standard 960x720 pixel template. (25.4cm x 19.05cm)